Cleanup your closet - Before and After

reflection

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So after posting my disaster of a "wiring closet", I was a little embarrassed and decided to clean it up. Some of you may have seen the before picture. Adding it as well as the "After". It's still not super clean, but a little more tidy.

The rack definitely cleans things up. I also moved my servers up to a shelf above the rack. And move one of the UPS from the ground the shelf. It was a pain crimping 48 5-in patch cables. The white cables are for non-POE devices and black cables for POE. The orange cables are fiber for 10G to my other server (it's in the case under the stairs in the Before picture). Everything connected to the PDU is protected by the UPS. The power strip is for devices that are not on UPS power.

If you have before and after pictures, please share :).

Before-After.png
 

reflection

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The panduct looks very clean. Not sure where I would use it though. Instead of a 48-port patch panel, I purposely used two 24-port - one above and below the switch. That allowed me to run short Ethernet patch cables to the switch. I'm thinking about placing some wood panel to cover all the wires coming from the back, top, and between the wood studs. It's an unfinished area in my basement so it might not make sense.

Curious what your cabinet in the bottom pic is for? Are those control systems?
 

TonyR

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The panduct looks very clean. Not sure where I would use it though. It's an unfinished area in my basement so it might not make sense.
For all those loose cables coming in, here and there. I understand it's a basement area but just in case you're OCD and space your clothes hangers at 1" in your bedroom closet, the Panduit would help. :p But if you 're happy with it, that's what counts, my man.
Curious what your cabinet in the bottom pic is for? Are those control systems?
Yes, not sure exactly, it came from the 'net. I did a dozen or more similar cabinets and panels back in the 90's using PLC's (Programmable Logic Controllers) and relays for, among others, a large emergency generator control system (delay start, overcrank, transfer, cool down, etc.), metro transit bus wash and water remediation controls, even a tennis court lighting and kiddie water feature spray controls in a public park. I never took any pictures, though...wish I had.

It can really save time trying to arrange and lace large bundles of wires and cables when you have a lot of devices. They really show their worth when you go back a year or 2 later to modify or add something...just mod the PLC program, snap cover off, run the wire and hook it up, snap cover back on..ta da...done. :cool:

The traffic signal cabinets I worked in and on for 31 years used nylon lacing (early on), expandable nylon sleeving (later on) and many, many nylon wire ties "zip ties"). It works, though.
 
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TonyR

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P.S. - Those cabinets used DIN rail, too...I L-O-V-E that stuff. No more plywood backboards or having to drill & tap a blind metal panel for machine screws.

And the Panduct was a great place to label your components or provide important notes or warnings, etc. using a laminated label (i.e. Brother) of specific colors.
 
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reflection

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DIN rails are more typical in industrial environments. My last company used to manufacturer industrial switches with DIN rail mounts. I think I might still have one in my basement. I think it was on DC powered. That form factor has its applications but much easier to find 19" rack equipment.
 
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