Time to share, my openalpr install

Discussion in 'LPR' started by Peter Vandenbergh, Apr 16, 2019.

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  1. Peter Vandenbergh

    Peter Vandenbergh n3wb

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    After reading almost every post on LPR I created my own setup.

    Intel I3 8Gb ram and 120GB SSD where I run openalpr on CentOS with a Dahua HFW5231EP-z camera.
    Results are amazing... but everyone already knows the capabilities of openalpr and Dahua.

    What I realy want to talk about is wat is behind this setup.

    I run an instance of Node-Red and read the plates from openalpr. From Node-red I store all plates in a influxdb database and the known plates (fammily, friends...) in a SQlite database.

    From there on the fun starts... Family and friends will get a spoken announcement on several google-home and sonos speakers each of them has a personalised message. I also get a push message on my phone.
    The lights in my house are also able to react on certain plates

    I also use grafana to create beautiful grafs and run some analytics on the stream of plates

    upload_2019-4-16_22-15-19.png
    Grafana

    upload_2019-4-16_22-16-16.png
    a node red flow (for the announcements)

    the possibilities with Node-red are endless
    If anyone is interested in more detail... I'm happy to help.
    I'm not native english... so please forgive any typo's

    Peter upload_2019-4-16_22-15-19.png upload_2019-4-16_22-16-16.png
     
    tech101, TheSwede, crw030 and 4 others like this.
  2. crw030

    crw030 Getting comfortable

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    Wow, jumping in this thread as I already have Node-Red setup on Raspberry Pi for recording temperature and humidity all through the house. I was too new to Raspberry Pi to get Grafana working, but as pretty as those are might have to retry. Right now I just log data to MS-SQL and visualize in Tableau because I have a license, but that's sweet and self-contained!
     
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  3. bigredfish

    bigredfish Known around here

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    Thank God there's folks in this world like you guys who actually understand this shit :)
     
  4. crw030

    crw030 Getting comfortable

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    Its like everything else google/try/fail/repeat. Node-Red is 80% drag & drop with a little script that you can easily find online to do common tasks. At least based on my experience in the shallow end of it!

    Node Red implements a pretty standard IoT protocol (MQTT) that you can do lots of stuff with (including some stuff in Blue Iris which made it interesting to me), I chose to run it on a Raspberry Pi to "play around" because the Pi was like $35 (actually like $80 for a beginner "everything you need and some stuff you dont" kit) and I always like to learn new stuff. Node-Red on Raspberry Pi made a ton of sense, because it can be networked and even PoE powered+hardwired network with the right plugin board (bah another $20 down the tubes), draws next to nothing power-wise, and is the size of two stacked deck of cards for mini-computer. I'm tinkering with Raspberry Pi as IoT hub for a mess of ESP8266 NodeMCU boards (like $6 mini processor with wifi) that can be scripted to do some simple stuff around the house (right now I have about half dozen measuring temperature and humidity around the house).

    Seems Peter is already way ahead of me. The LPR stuff is very interesting to me and I don't even have an LPR camera yet.
     
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  5. tech101

    tech101 Getting the hang of it

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    Thank you so much Peter You are a inspiration for people like me. Thank you! And your chart makes such a complex task seems simple to understand. Thank you ! I hope one day I can understand this and have my own Open ALPR running locally.
     
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