Ethernet, POE, Gigabit Switch, Which One Do I Need?

TonyR

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I read it on some website some where. It said switch to router connection required a crossover cable and everything else was straight through cable.
+1^^ to @Mike A. words above.
Back before Auto MDI/MDI-X ports on switches and PC LAN ports became common, you did need a cross-over cable for certain situations, like PC to IP camera or PC to PC, now that's no longer a requirement with modern networking devices. That being said, you could use a cross-over cable PC to PC and if both are Auto MDI/MDI-X ports then it would work anyway (but it's not necessary).
 

johnfitz

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Back before Auto MDI/MDI-X ports on switches and PC LAN ports became common, you did need a cross-over cable for certain situations
Ha! I thought they were still required also... just googled to see when that might have changed:

Automatic crossover
Introduced in 1998, this made the distinction between uplink and normal ports and manual selector switches on older hubs and switches obsolete. If one or both of two connected devices has the automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration feature, there is no need for crossover cables.


Guess I haven't kept up with new networking technology :)
 

savatreatabvr

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+1^^ to @Mike A. words above.
Back before Auto MDI/MDI-X ports on switches and PC LAN ports became common, you did need a cross-over cable for certain situations, like PC to IP camera or PC to PC, now that's no longer a requirement with modern networking devices. That being said, you could use a cross-over cable PC to PC and if both are Auto MDI/MDI-X ports then it would work anyway (but it's not necessary).
Well see, this is exactly why this forum rocks. Not so technical people like myself can get technical questions answered by honest members. I was a Special Systems tech (commercial, security, fire, access control, CCTV & life safety systems installation) for ATT Integrated Technologies, Honeywell and sub contracted at Intel for Orion Security Specialist but 20 years later a simple ethernet cable question stumped me. Hold on, to save myself from being persecuted by simple common industry standards, like I said it was 20 years ago when I was a SST, lol. Back when crossover cables were commonly used.
 

johnfitz

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pin 7 was ground
You know... I googled before I wrote that to make sure ground was pin 7... was a bit surprised it was pin 5... did not realize I was looking at a pinout for the DB-9 connector... I had always worked with the DB-25 and you are right 1990 was probably when they went out of style... along with the last of the DEC VT-100's
 

TonyR

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You know... I googled before I wrote that to make sure ground was pin 7... was a bit surprised it was pin 5... did not realize I was looking at a pinout for the DB-9 connector... I had always worked with the DB-25 and you are right 1990 was probably when they went out of style... along with the last of the DEC VT-100's
Even TX & RX were swapped between the DB-9 and the DB-25 but it didn't matter because it was 2 to 3 and 3 to 2 on BOTH 9's and 25's for a null modem cable. :lol:
 

wittaj

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Now you have to go into the NVR and manually enter each camera - the NVR will only "auto populate" the cameras connected to the NVR POE ports.

Any cameras coming into the NVR via the WAN/LAN port need to be manually entered.
 

The Automation Guy

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I still use DB9 serial cables - null and regular. A lot of equipment is hooked into automation systems via a serial plug. Obviously it is becoming less common now because everything is communicating over IP, but I still have probably a half dozen devices that use serial connections for communication. Once it is set up, it is extremely stable.
 

savatreatabvr

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Now you have to go into the NVR and manually enter each camera - the NVR will only "auto populate" the cameras connected to the NVR POE ports.

Any cameras coming into the NVR via the WAN/LAN port need to be manually entered.
Both of my cheap cable testers told me the cable running to the router from the POE switch was open or the cable length was to long but the continuity test on both testers said the cable was good. The specs on the cheap testers say they accurately read up to 360' but the cable run isn't more that 200' so yeah you can say I have no hair left. But come to find out, the rj45 connectors I was using, links below, are basically junk so I found some other connectors that are easier the use and fit in the sockets better, last link.

Now all 16 cameras are up and working perfectly! I guess the moral of this story is if you want good results from the very beginning, simply buy expensive test equipment and materials and toss your cheap stuff in the trash. Don't bother giving them away, they'll just cause headaches for the people you give them too so toss them out! Thank you to the members who helped me by sharing their knowledge and time. Wait, I'm not done asking question yet, stay tuned, lol! Thanks again.




 
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