Good/bad idea to mount a camera to a tree?

tigerwillow1

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Just a few leaves in the view will hurt the image beyond a lot
I learned that the hard way. Anything the camera sees close-in is really bright in the IR light. When the camera adjusts its exposure for that, everything else becomes too dark.
 

DsineR

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Anyway, about the tree sway: LPR images are by nature fast shutter speed, right? I'm having trouble imagining the tree trunk moving fast enough to be an issue for LPR.
Correct on the fast shutter speed, mine is set to 1/2000 - which still causes issues with cam shakes.
But the problem with the camera moving is the trigger and how the LPR cam is set to capture the plate. I use Simple & Zones during daytime, then Edge Vector at night. Any movement is amplified thru the eyes of a zoom in cam = false triggers.
 

sebastiantombs

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If you're putting in LPR cameras, why do you need an eight foot tall pole or are you shooting over 100 feet to get the LPR?
 

Video1

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If you're putting in LPR cameras, why do you need an eight foot tall pole or are you shooting over 100 feet to get the LPR?

How high should a camera for LPR duty be mounted? I was thinking of mounting it above the average person's reach to avoid vandalism. I suppose I could create a lockable top for the birdhouse that I'm going to install the cameras in.
 

sebastiantombs

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I'm not expert with LPR, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night (translation...have been reading the threads hers about LPR). Generally you want as straight an angle as possible to get really good LPR shots. The straighter the better, both azimuth and elevation. Four feet would be optimal, six feet OK, eight feet may be too high depending on the distance from the camera to the target.
 

vandyman

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Buy a 10ft length of 1 1/2" emt and bury it 2ft with quick Crete.
Finished..

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

Video1

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Electrical metallic tubing. Metal conduit you can bury.

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Ahh....thanks! But is that rigid enough? Looks like Home Depot has it up to 3” diameter. How would that compare to a 6x6 pressure treated wooden post? It needs to hold at least 2 cameras.
 

sebastiantombs

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I'd use two inch EMT, but that's the Clark Griswald in me. An 1-1/2 or 2" EMT will easily hold two cameras with no problems.
 

sebastiantombs

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I should have commented that you'll want to cap the top end of the EMT, if you use that, to prevent water accumulating inside the pipe. I'd also drill a hole about a foot from the bottom end and put a 3/8 or 1/2" rod through it to prevent the EMT from turning at all, even if an attempt is made to rotate it maliciously.
 

Video1

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So it seems my options are to mount to:
1) big tree
2) 6x6 wood post
3) 2" or 3" electrical metal conduit
4) 3" light pole for a post lamp

Which would be the most stable?

The tree would be cheap because it only involves a band mount.

The 6x6 is fairly inexpensive as well. It doesn't seem like a 6x6 buried 2 feet or more into concrete, would move much.
 

sebastiantombs

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Like I said, I'd use 2" EMT. Cheap and strong. A 6x6 is a little overkill. You could get away with a 4x4 as well. Problem with both of those is that they'll rot at the base eventually, even "treated" or CCA lumber. The tree, no matter where you mount the camera, will continue to grow and bury the straps and mount eventually if you don't get up there and adjust things regularly. I have fence posts, 4x4s, buried about three feet with concrete. Yes, they, too, rot at the base.

I've used 1-1/4" EMT for antenna masts for a long time, ham radio operator for years. If that, 1-1/4", will handle a three or four square foot surface area antenna in 75mph winds, a 2" will more than handle a couple of cameras.
 

CCTVCam

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You could also kill the tree if you don't slaken the straps off as it grows. Once it goes all the way through the bark all the way around, it cuts the circulation off in the tree - it's call Ring Barking or sometimes girdling.
 

Redridge

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Keep insects in mind. I have found entire colonies inside, they like the heat generated from the circuit boards.

I like to suspend domes on close parallel cables between two trees. I find two younger trees that will still bend a little under portable winch force. Pull them taut toward each other first, suspend the cables as close to level as you can, then let off the winch. I got the idea from installing large shade sails using similar techniques. The Warn Pullzall 24 volt works great for this.
 

Regulator

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I know this is an old thread but in case anyone searches it in the future, I've had great success with cams in trees. My main goal was aesthetics and concealment from a security standpoint. Hidden cameras are less likely to be disabled. I started putting these cameras up about 9 years ago and over that time have 39 wired on CAT5 or 6 direct bury. (12 are mounted to structures or non tree mounts ) Some runs are in conduit but most aren't. I buried any of the direct bury lines that were through lawns or any area where foot traffic, vehicle etc but have thousands of feet through the woods. For the long runs in the woods I just scraped them to the base and covered back up. 9 years and they are inches deep in mulch, deadfall etc. This was super easy and fast. For runs over 300' or so I would uninterrupted cable and use veracity at both ends.

As to the cameras in the trees, Most are in pines, hardwoods, some do take trimming in the spring but not many. Someone above is correct about the PTZ higher up in the pines, in decent winds it does sway some zoomed but its not bad at all. The main issue is not having any junctions in the runs from base to cam because of corrosion. At thee tree you either have to push the sealed connection into the hollow mount arm or use a cheap box off amazon with the cables entering from the bottom. Ive never lost a camera from lightning but have lost some POE hubs and we get struck a lot. In the years I've lived in this house the gate has been hit and disabled at least 5 or 6 times and lots of tree strikes. The main thing I've learned is no splices anywhere, veracity solves all distance issues, have a helper install so you have one on the dumb end and one on the smart end, long walks or gator rides opening and closing gates gets old.

The image below is how not to secure the connection. This one lasted about 5 years before the connection corroded even with the manufacturers " weather tight connection" The bases are just bark sheds and PL232. I also painted them later in the learning process with a mix of camo and texture paint that made it even better. Leave the lens plastic on when they come in and tape the joints before spraying and the end product is really nice. All that is left is the glass bezel. Also the newer Lorex 4K PTZ are so quiet I can zoom and pan above the kids and they cant hear it. With this method I was able to cover 26 acres of property with almost no blind spots.


IMG_4109.jpg
 

Parley

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I currently have 4 cameras in a pine tree. No problems at all. I did run PVC conduit up to the base of the tree. I then put camouflage tape around each cable as it left the conduit to help hide it.
 
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