Need help with VTO2202F-P

AlbertoIt

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Hello guys. I have bought a new VTO2202F-P that was intended to replace my broken VTO2000A.
I wanted to test it before mounting in its place so I connected it to my VTNS1060A but it didn't show anything....then I tried to connect to a Poe switch and nothing happened as well.
Finally I tried to power it with a 12V power supply and it seems to be on...but it sounds strange that it has no light in the name plate.
So what could be the problem with Poe?
I read that the vtns is not a normal switch but a passive switch....could it be the problem? Did I do a stupid thing connecting the new vto to it?


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AlbertoIt

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Ok, I'm definitively an idiot...I was trying to connect to a non Poe port of the switch...it seems to be ok connecting in the right port.
But I still have a question. Could I damage this vto if I connect to the vtns1060a? I'm asking because I found this (see picture) in a UK website.IMG-20200114-WA0019.jpg

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catcamstar

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From wikipedia:

Passive POE
The common 100 Mbit/s passive applications use the pinout of 802.3af mode B - with DC plus on pins 4 and 5 and DC minus on 7 and 8 (see chart below) and data on 1-2 and 3-6. Gigabit passive injectors use a transformer on the data pins to allow power and data to share the cable and is typically compatible with 802.3af Mode A. In the common "passive" PoE system, the injector does not communicate with the powered device to negotiate its voltage or wattage requirements, but merely supplies power at all times. Passive midspan injectors up to 12 ports simplify installations.
Devices needing 5 Volts cannot typically use PoE at 5 V on Ethernet cable beyond short distances (about 15 feet (4.6 m)) as the voltage drop of the cable becomes too significant, so a 24 V or 48 V to 5 V DC-DC converter is required at the remote end.[50]
Passive PoE power sources are commonly used with a variety of indoor and outdoor wireless radio equipment, most commonly from Motorola (now Cambium), Ubiquiti Networks, MikroTik and others. Earlier versions of passive PoE 24VDC power sources shipped with 802.11a, 802.11g and 802.11n based radios are commonly 100 Mbit/s only. Specifications vary by manufacturer and model, but some of the common specifications include:[citation needed]

  • 24VDC 0.5A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 24VDC 1.0A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 48VDC 1.0A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 56VDC 1.0A and 2.0A 1 Gbit/s (used for 45W+ load point to point microwave and millimeter band radios)

Passive DC-to-DC injectors also exist which convert a 9 V to 36 V DC, or 36 V to 72 V DC power source to a stabilized 24 V 1 A, 48 V 0.5 A, or up to 48V 2.0A PoE feed with '+' on pins 4 & 5 and '−' on pins 7 & 8. These DC-to-DC PoE injectors are used in various telecom applications.[51]


versus

The original IEEE 802.3af-2003[1] PoE standard provides up to 15.4 W of DC power (minimum 44 V DC and 350 mA[2][3]) on each port.[4] Only 12.95 W is assured to be available at the powered device as some power dissipates in the cable.[5] The updated IEEE 802.3at-2009[6] PoE standard also known as PoE+ or PoE plus, provides up to 25.5 W of power for Type 2 devices.[7] The 2009 standard prohibits a powered device from using all four pairs for power.[8] Both of these standards have since been incorporated into the IEEE 802.3-2012 publication.[9]

So if I was you, if it is stated to be dangerous, I wouldn't put the new VTO on the VTNS.
 

AlbertoIt

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From wikipedia:

Passive POE
The common 100 Mbit/s passive applications use the pinout of 802.3af mode B - with DC plus on pins 4 and 5 and DC minus on 7 and 8 (see chart below) and data on 1-2 and 3-6. Gigabit passive injectors use a transformer on the data pins to allow power and data to share the cable and is typically compatible with 802.3af Mode A. In the common "passive" PoE system, the injector does not communicate with the powered device to negotiate its voltage or wattage requirements, but merely supplies power at all times. Passive midspan injectors up to 12 ports simplify installations.
Devices needing 5 Volts cannot typically use PoE at 5 V on Ethernet cable beyond short distances (about 15 feet (4.6 m)) as the voltage drop of the cable becomes too significant, so a 24 V or 48 V to 5 V DC-DC converter is required at the remote end.[50]
Passive PoE power sources are commonly used with a variety of indoor and outdoor wireless radio equipment, most commonly from Motorola (now Cambium), Ubiquiti Networks, MikroTik and others. Earlier versions of passive PoE 24VDC power sources shipped with 802.11a, 802.11g and 802.11n based radios are commonly 100 Mbit/s only. Specifications vary by manufacturer and model, but some of the common specifications include:[citation needed]

  • 24VDC 0.5A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 24VDC 1.0A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 48VDC 1.0A 100 Mbit/s or 1 Gbit/s
  • 56VDC 1.0A and 2.0A 1 Gbit/s (used for 45W+ load point to point microwave and millimeter band radios)

Passive DC-to-DC injectors also exist which convert a 9 V to 36 V DC, or 36 V to 72 V DC power source to a stabilized 24 V 1 A, 48 V 0.5 A, or up to 48V 2.0A PoE feed with '+' on pins 4 & 5 and '−' on pins 7 & 8. These DC-to-DC PoE injectors are used in various telecom applications.[51]


versus

The original IEEE 802.3af-2003[1] PoE standard provides up to 15.4 W of DC power (minimum 44 V DC and 350 mA[2][3]) on each port.[4] Only 12.95 W is assured to be available at the powered device as some power dissipates in the cable.[5] The updated IEEE 802.3at-2009[6] PoE standard also known as PoE+ or PoE plus, provides up to 25.5 W of power for Type 2 devices.[7] The 2009 standard prohibits a powered device from using all four pairs for power.[8] Both of these standards have since been incorporated into the IEEE 802.3-2012 publication.[9]

So if I was you, if it is stated to be dangerous, I wouldn't put the new VTO on the VTNS.
In fact that's the problem. At the end I found this draw and that's exactly what I did. Thanks catcamstar, you're always helpful.
By the way, the vto2202f has a much better camera than the older vto's!IMG-20200114-WA0019.jpg

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JanT

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Ok, I'm definitively an idiot...I was trying to connect to a non Poe port of the switch...it seems to be ok connecting in the right port.
But I still have a question. Could I damage this vto if I connect to the vtns1060a? I'm asking because I found this (see picture) in a UK website.View attachment 53901

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So what Poe should i use to power up my VTO2202F-P ? , i have injectors of 12V, usually works perfectly for all Dahua cameras, but this time VTO2202F-P looks dead , no action at all, unable to detect, nothing .. i am trying to connect it to standard gigabit switch, with PoE injectors to LAN cables
 

AlbertoIt

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So what Poe should i use to power up my VTO2202F-P ? , i have injectors of 12V, usually works perfectly for all Dahua cameras, but this time VTO2202F-P looks dead , no action at all, unable to detect, nothing .. i am trying to connect it to standard gigabit switch, with PoE injectors to LAN cables
Mine is working with the same Poe switch of cameras. Check if you are connecting it to a poe port...

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