Poe in nvr vs Poe switch

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by batcave, Oct 12, 2018.

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  1. batcave

    batcave Young grasshopper

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    So I’ve been asking a lot of dumb questions here lately. I’ve had cctv since 2005 but now find myself wanting to learn more.

    I’ve read a couple posts where the person has a NVR with Poe but chose to use a Poe switch instead. Why would be the reason for that?

    2nd question about Poe+. I assume some cameras like PTZ need more power to run than provided by regular Poe. So in this case they would have to run a Poe+ switch. Is that correct?
     
  2. aristobrat

    aristobrat Known around here

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    A separate PoE switch allows the NVR to be located in places other than where the network cables from the cameras terminate. Folks can have the NVR located in an office/living room without having multiple network cables running to it.

    A separate PoE switch also allows for the PoE devices to be on the same subnet as the other devices. NVRs with PoE built-in almost always isolate the cameras on their own subnet, which can make directly accessing them (like from the web browser on your computer) more difficult. Lately, some recent NVR w/ PoE firmware updates do provide a link you can click on to directly access the cameras on their own subnet, so that's lessened this concern for some folks.

    Most PoE switches support PoE+, but to your point, you do have to make sure your switch is capable of supporting the specific PoE standards that your PoE devices need.
     
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  3. batcave

    batcave Young grasshopper

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    When I moved to this house and installed system, I ran a 2” conduit from my basement to where the NVR is. Then ran 9 cables for cameras and 1 for my network. So what you are saying is, all camera cables could have terminated in basement via switch and I only need one network cable to nvr. Lol. Ya, I did it wrong for sure. Unless there is an advantage to having all cameras terminate in NVR.

    it is, a pain in the ass to get 9 direct bury cat5e cables into nvr for sure. Cables are stiff.
     
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  4. tigerwillow1

    tigerwillow1 Getting comfortable

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    I went with a separate switch to keep the investment in the nvr as low as possible. If I need to replace the switch or nvr (due to failure or upgrade), the cost and work will both be lower. I also chose to use a managed switch. I use few of the features, but they are darn handy for monitoring and troubleshooting. When I was building the system, there were abundant good deals on used small business switches, making my total cost a bit lower than for the same nvr with poe built in. It does take a little research to make a good choice for which switch.
     
  5. looney2ns

    looney2ns Known around here

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    Another reason...noise. NVR's with builtin POE make more noise from the fans.
     
  6. batcave

    batcave Young grasshopper

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    Doesn’t really matter in my case but good point.