Router

Discussion in 'Camera Installation Questions' started by Ed Boyer, Jun 13, 2019.

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  1. Ed Boyer

    Ed Boyer n3wb

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    I have a Actiontec modem/router from verizon on the second floor of my house. I would like to move my modem/router to my basement near the location were the cat5 enters my basement from the garage were it is connected to a NVR. Problem is when I move it my WIFI signal is weak to my deasktop. I have a ASUS AC2400 router that I can connect to the Actiontec but it has to be connected wireless, its next to impossible to get a Cat5 to it. Will this be OK connecting the modem/router and the router wireless or does they have to be a wired connection. Thanks
     
  2. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    IMO, if given 3 choices:
     
  3. Mike A.

    Mike A. Getting comfortable

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    Not sure that you can connect the Asus to the Actiontec directly via WiFi can you?

    As an additional option to Tony's above, Verizon FIOS also has what I think that they call a "wireless extender" which connects via coax to provide a wireless access point and 4(?)-port switch at that end of the cable where it's installed. Basically just another Actiontec router without the routing. I'm assuming that what you have now is the Actiontec connected via coax in its current location and no network cable there otherwise which is why you're left with nothing on the second floor after moving it. That would take the place of the current Actiontec to provide wireless on the second floor and you can move the current Actiontec to the basement or wherever else on the coax. Or in that case you could also just use another Actiontec router if you can find one cheap somewhere. You just need something to bridge the physical MoCA and Ethernet media which is what either will do.

    Also, generally the best way to go with FIOS in most cases is to have the connection from the ONT switched to the Ethernet port. Then you can put your Asus up front as your primary router with VPN vs the Actiontec which doesn't provide that option and having to pass through. Normally if you don't have FIOS TV service then you don't need the Actiontec at all but in your case if you have no network cable other than the coax then you may. In that case the Actiontecs can be put behind the Asus either as node on the same or as a separate routed network (which also works with TV service if you do have it or you can go with their new Fios TV One boxes which are wireless).
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  4. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    @Ed Boyer ,

    Perhaps it's my old brain but it's not clear to me what you have and what you're wanting to accomplish....a sketch would help (at least this old brain).
    I say that for several reasons:

    1) Wireless is to be avoided whenever possible when it comes to bandwidth-intensive applications such as video streaming. In addition, it's reliability (or lack thereof) is also a factor when we are talking video surveillance.
    2) Cascading routers especially when connected LAN to WAN causing a double NAT is not only unnecessary (likely) but can add slight undesirable delay in the process. Only one router needs to be the DHCP server and handing out IP's to the LAN. The second (downstream) router could have its DHCP disabled, assigned a static IP and connected via its LAN port and therefore becomes a switch with a wireless access point, providing additional Wi-Fi in the vicinity of its installation.
    3) A wireless layer 2 transparent bridge between 2 LAN segments can be a workable solution in SOME cases. I'm talking 2 Ubiquiti NanoStation AC Loco 5GHz radios configured as AP and Station using AirMax and WDS enabled. This is an additional expense (about $50 apiece) and is generally used outdoors to connect remote segments and/or provide air-gap interconnection in areas with extreme lightning issues. It could be used indoors and could work well in many cases if using cable is not an option.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
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  5. Ed Boyer

    Ed Boyer n3wb

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    TonyR thanks, maybe you could tell me the best way to handle this. I have one Actiontec router on the middle floor of my house. The cat5 that is connected to the NVR comes into the house through wall. I cannot get that cat5 up to the middle floor because the basement is drywall. When I move the router to the basement were I can connect the cat5 to it my WIFI signal is weak.
     
  6. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    Don't move Actiontec router to basement, leave it where it is.

    Plug in one of the PLA's (Power Line Adapter) like I linked in post #2 above into a AC power receptacle near Actiontec router and run Ethernet cable from the PLA to a LAN port on the ActionTec router.
    In basement, plug in the other PLA into an AC power receptacle and plug the CAT-5 from the NVR into the PLA's Ethernet port.
     
  7. Ed Boyer

    Ed Boyer n3wb

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    Thanks, I've seen power line adapters and figured that was the easy way to go.
     
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