which PoE switches are recommended and work for all cameras?

rotation

Young grasshopper
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Hello all,

I have a few Hikvision and other (small brands but could be rebranded Hikvision) cameras.
All of them are powered via PoE, but a few years ago I had problems with this setup.

The cameras were working fine but randomly they stopped working and did not power back up again.
I do not remember the reason but I think it was the Netgear switch which was missing a PoE protocol the cameras needed - I do not remember anymore.
This lead me to add PoE injectors and the cameras work fine.

As I would like to get rid of the PoE Injectors, could you tell me which PoE Switches work well and are recommended for all cameras?
 

saltwater

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I run 13 Dahua (Andy's 5441 or is it 5442's) cameras and 5 access points. I have two Ubiquity 24 port POE switches. One is 250w and the other is a 500w. I've had them running my cameras and access points for two years now and they haven't missed a beat.
 

amdpowered

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It depends on what cameras you have and their POE requirements.

I’ve been using Brocade switches for POE and POE+ devices without issues. In the past when trying to power a PTZ that was of the POE+ type with a cheap switch, it wouldn’t work.

If you have POE++ or Hi-POE requirements, then the brocade switch way can get expensive unless you have a bunch of POE++ cameras that make it worth it.

Setting up a managed brocade switch (icx6430, icx6450, etc) is not for everyone as it’s an actual enterprise grade switch.
 

slidermike

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The Netgear switches should have lifetime warranty. See if they will swap the old one. Depending on if its EOL they may upgrade as part of the process.

I have newer poe cameras (no older than 2yrs old) and my Netgear poe switch works great. Though I wish it was higher port density. Cost vs need ;)

If you do not need to manage the switch and you know the poe standard you need today and tomorrow, you might want to check out a recent review of an unmanaged 8port poe+ 2.5gb switch by Serve the Home.
I think its only avail on AliExpress but for the price you cannot beat it.
I just put one of these into my home net for added density.
I do miss managing but again.. 8 ports of poe+ at 2.5gb and the price is good.
 

Flintstone61

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It sounds like your Netgear had some failure.
If it worked at some point, then it had the POE protocols the cams needed.
Probably Just replace the switch.
If you buy something new with a return window on Amazon, you can test another switch and see if that fixes the problem.
It doesn't sound like you have a huge system that needs an enterprise switch.
if the switch supports POE 802.3at you should be fine.
Also the cheaper switches may support 802.3at, but not on all ports.
Because they have a budget of X amount of power to share across Y amount of ports.
but thats probably all you need.
If your average 802.3af camera uses 7 watts, multiply that by # of cams and see how many watts that is.
then look for a switch that rated higher than what you need.
 

Flintstone61

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Sybertiger

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I use two of these. If one goes out then you still have the other and not totally out of business. Gigabit uplink ports plus some lightning protection.

 
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jmltech

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I’ve been using this POE switch. It is manage, so you can see what the wattage is for each port, as well as adjust the POE++ ports into POE+ or just plain POE. The only thing I don’t like is that there isn’t a separate LAN port. 8 ports, 230 watts
What I like is the 230W total power. The first 4 ports can be configured for POE+, POE++ (802.3bt and 802.3max power), 802.3AF and 802.3AT, ports 5-8 can be set for 802.3AF or 802.3AT. You can also cycle power for any of the ports directly from the switch.
It's a great little switch with control over each port.

Netgear 8 port POE switch
 
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tech_junkie

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Hello all,

I have a few Hikvision and other (small brands but could be rebranded Hikvision) cameras.
All of them are powered via PoE, but a few years ago I had problems with this setup.

The cameras were working fine but randomly they stopped working and did not power back up again.
I do not remember the reason but I think it was the Netgear switch which was missing a PoE protocol the cameras needed - I do not remember anymore.
This lead me to add PoE injectors and the cameras work fine.

As I would like to get rid of the PoE Injectors, could you tell me which PoE Switches work well and are recommended for all cameras?
BV sw-811 and BV sw-801 is what I to use for an installs But a switch is half the equation as not all poe cameras, you should really power by poe. The small turrets and domes are ok, but I find the larger PTZ cameras needs to run off the power supply they come with. Mainly because there are physical limitations with POE and distance.
 

versitron

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Each type of IP camera has specific power requirements. You can check out Versitron PoE switches that work well with all cameras like basic IP Cameras and PTZ HD IP Cameras. They offer reliable power delivery, sufficient Ethernet and SFP port capacity, and robust performance.
 

The Automation Guy

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While there are different POE protocols, the primary difference between them is the amount of power a device provides or is allowed to draw. Obviously if you have a device that requires more power (like a large PTZ camera), your POE network switch needs to support that power protocol in order to be able to provide enough power for that device to function. If your switch cannot handle a particular POE protocol, you can always use a separate POE injector to provide the higher power requirements for that device.

Here are the different POE protocols (the max power is per port/device):
802.3af type 1 (POE) - max power 15.40 watts
802.3at type 2(POE+) - max power 30 watts
802.3bt type 3 (POE++) - max power 60 watts
802.3bt type 4 (POE++) - max power 90 watts

In addition to the "per port" power specs, switches will also have a "total POE power" specification. This is the maximum POE power that the switch can produce and provide across all of its ports. Sometimes that is high enough that every port could draw POE power at the highest allowed value per the supported POE protocols. Other times the switch has a lower total POE power spec that won't allow every port to receive the max power allowed. For example, you might have a 48 port switch that supports 802.3bt type 3 which is 60 watts per port. If the switch is spec'd to provide 2880 watts or more of total POA power, then it would support all 48 ports at the max 60 watts. However if the switch only supplies a total of 1500 watts of POE power, that means it would support 48 ports at 30 watts or less, but you could only provide POE power to 25 devices if every device needed/used the full 60 watts. If you plan on using a lot of POE devices, you just want to add up the power requirements of all of your expected devices and make sure the total amount falls within the total POE power spec of the switch.

That being said, if you cameras worked fine and then stopped working at some point, that is due to a hardware failure - most likely the switch had a failure in the POE system/power supply.
 
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tech_junkie

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Hello all,

I have a few Hikvision and other (small brands but could be rebranded Hikvision) cameras.
All of them are powered via PoE, but a few years ago I had problems with this setup.

The cameras were working fine but randomly they stopped working and did not power back up again.
I do not remember the reason but I think it was the Netgear switch which was missing a PoE protocol the cameras needed - I do not remember anymore.
This lead me to add PoE injectors and the cameras work fine.

As I would like to get rid of the PoE Injectors, could you tell me which PoE Switches work well and are recommended for all cameras?
Beyond switches, there is limitations to POE runs. But most POE switches will work with cameras, however, they do have modes that are not compatible. Don't run them in VLan or Concentrate mode because that is designed for certain IOT networking that is not compatible with IP Cameras.
 
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