Alarm panels and sensors. Who has put resistors at EOL for residential?

Holbs

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I have a new DSC 1832 panel I have yet to fire up (waiting on power supply and battery). Recessed sensors for windows and doors all set.
However, before I close up all the swiss cheesed drywall I cut out, the EOL resistors come to mind. It seems, they are great for additional security in a business environment. But are they needed in residential? These would be resistors that are inserted near the senors, not the box.
 

jmcu

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EOL devices / resistors are placed at the end of the circuit when you want the circuit to be supervised for residential or commercial.
They are not "needed" for either unless it is a life safety circuit ( fire alarm ) and then that depends on the AHJ.
It's purpose is to provide the panel with a notification of when there is a trouble within the circuit. ie. a sensor failure, fault or short.
 

Holbs

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so now the question is... should I or should I not? :) I think I will. Doesn't hurt. Will take a little bit of time to add in some troubleshooting insurance but I only get 1 shot at a thumbs up or thumbs down. Might as well get it out of the way.
 

jmcu

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It's not a bad idea to have and can save a lot of time troubleshooting the circuit... Just keep in mind you dont want to bury it in the wall.. you will regret it later..
 

Holbs

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I have recessed window/door sensors. Thought the EOL resistors are to be inches before the sensor.
 

jmcu

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They only need to be at the end of the last sensor in the circuit.. ( should be) Many like to put them ITP- in the panel - but that is not the correct location.
 

CCTVCam

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EOL devices / resistors are placed at the end of the circuit when you want the circuit to be supervised for residential or commercial.
They are not "needed" for either unless it is a life safety circuit ( fire alarm ) and then that depends on the AHJ.
It's purpose is to provide the panel with a notification of when there is a trouble within the circuit. ie. a sensor failure, fault or short.
My understanding is they allow you to differentiate between short circuit and fault. The panel will detect both but in a commercial environment it's necessary to detect the difference due to the more sophisticated methods burglars may use.
 

fenderman

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They only need to be at the end of the last sensor in the circuit.. ( should be) Many like to put them ITP- in the panel - but that is not the correct location.
This guy has an interesting video on EOL resistors. At about 12 minuets in, he shows a technique using a 4 conductor wire that allows the EOL resistor to be properly placed in the panel.
 
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Tom S

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This guy has an interesting video on EOL resistors. At about 12 minuets in, he shows a technique using a 4 conductor wire that allows the EOL resistor to be properly placed in the panel.
I think you might have missed adding a link fenderman.
 

Tom S

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You are so miles ahead by having physical sensors on all of your doors and windows compared to most houses that the EOL resistor location is pretty minor point. I did all mine in the panel and have zero issues with long term use on a Honeywell system. The average home burglar is a dumb ass not some kind of mastermind.
 

Holbs

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Federman...I think I saw that video of using 4 pair wire instead of two so you that you can put resistors in the alarm box. Too late for me :) Already ran 2 wire. Now to decide if putting a resistor forever behind repaired drywall is a good idea, or not so good idea.
 

Tom S

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If you hide the sensor in the drywall will you have the ability to replace a bad sensor down the road or deal with a damaged wire right at the sensor right where damage is likely to happen?
 

Holbs

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If you hide the sensor in the drywall will you have the ability to replace a bad sensor down the road or deal with a damaged wire right at the sensor right where damage is likely to happen?
The master plan is... to attach the resistor to the back of the recessed sensor. All window/door sensors are horizontal through adjoining studs with a ... um... er... 1/2" hole? The sensor will be epoxied or glued into the hole with 5-6" slack of 2 wire in the wall. I think...if anything ever goes amiss with the sensor or resistor, I can pry it out from window/door frame and see what's going on.
I did buy a 20 pack of these for sensors:
41I7wr3-PzL._AC_SL1001_.jpg
 

th182

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I have a self-installed system as well and am using similar recessed sensors. Smart move leaving some slack so they can be pulled out if needed.

I did not go the end resistor route just for simplicity of installation. Kind of wish I had since one of my garage door sensor wires broke (it was exposed and something snagged on it at some point). Had no idea it wasn't working for quite a while before I noticed it was always reporting open. If I had those resistors it would have generated a trouble. I'd say if you can do it now, get it done!
 
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