ChatGPT (Chat Generative Pre-trained Transformer)

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Professor accuses students of plagiarism by running papers through chatGPT...
I don't think running suspected writing through AI is a good way to know if it was generated BY an AI source. The algorithms outlined by Turnitin (a plagiarism checking service) seems to be a good detection system -- for NOW.... give it another year or two and I think it will be impossible to tell.
 

TRLcam

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I don't think running suspected writing through AI is a good way to know if it was generated BY an AI source. The algorithms outlined by Turnitin (a plagiarism checking service) seems to be a good detection system -- for NOW.... give it another year or two and I think it will be impossible to tell.
I just ran your response through Chat GPT-4.

As AI models continue to evolve and improve, distinguishing between human and AI-generated text is indeed becoming a more challenging task. For example, OpenAI's GPT series has shown increasing sophistication from version to version, with GPT-3 and later models generating text that can sometimes be nearly indistinguishable from human writing.

Turnitin and other similar services use a variety of techniques to detect unusual patterns, such as statistical analysis, stylometry, and semantic analysis. Some of these can be effective in identifying AI-generated text, because AI text often has subtle patterns that are not typically seen in human writing. These can include peculiar phrasings, repetitions, or an unusual depth of knowledge on a wide range of topics.

However, as AI continues to improve, these giveaways are likely to become less prevalent. Over time, as you suggest, we might reach a point where AI-generated text is indistinguishable from human writing, at least to automated systems.

Yet, it's important to note that even as AI models get better, so too can detection methods. There are multiple facets to the development of AI, and one important area is the development of AI that can detect other AI. The arms race between AI generation and detection will continue, and there will likely always be a need for tools that can identify AI-generated content, particularly in areas like academic integrity, journalism, and legal documents.

In the end, the ability to discern AI-generated text from human text may be a combination of advanced algorithms and human intuition and expertise, with each playing a crucial role. It's a fascinating area of ongoing development in the AI field.
 

concord

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I don't think running suspected writing through AI is a good way to know if it was generated BY an AI source. The algorithms outlined by Turnitin (a plagiarism checking service) seems to be a good detection system -- for NOW.... give it another year or two and I think it will be impossible to tell.
The company I worked for routed everything through our publishing group (i.e. software manuals, technical reports and conference presentations) and they used iThenticate. Didn't seem logical to do my software manuals, however it found similar text from my old2 - 8 years old manuals :).
 
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The company I worked for routed everything through our publishing group (i.e. software manuals, technical reports and conference presentations) and they used iThenticate. Didn't seem logical to do my software manuals, however it found similar text from my old2 - 8 years old manuals :).
Cool! Technical manuals would DEFINITELY have a high percentage of similar text if they are dealing with the same topics. I had never heard of iThenticate before-- looks pretty cool, but it doesn't seem to be looking at AI-generated text... or I'm not seeing that...

 
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I just ran your response through Chat GPT-4.

As AI models continue to evolve and improve, distinguishing between human and AI-generated text is indeed becoming a more challenging task. For example, OpenAI's GPT series has shown increasing sophistication from version to version, with GPT-3 and later models generating text that can sometimes be nearly indistinguishable from human writing.

Turnitin and other similar services use a variety of techniques to detect unusual patterns, such as statistical analysis, stylometry, and semantic analysis. Some of these can be effective in identifying AI-generated text, because AI text often has subtle patterns that are not typically seen in human writing. These can include peculiar phrasings, repetitions, or an unusual depth of knowledge on a wide range of topics.

However, as AI continues to improve, these giveaways are likely to become less prevalent. Over time, as you suggest, we might reach a point where AI-generated text is indistinguishable from human writing, at least to automated systems.

Yet, it's important to note that even as AI models get better, so too can detection methods. There are multiple facets to the development of AI, and one important area is the development of AI that can detect other AI. The arms race between AI generation and detection will continue, and there will likely always be a need for tools that can identify AI-generated content, particularly in areas like academic integrity, journalism, and legal documents.

In the end, the ability to discern AI-generated text from human text may be a combination of advanced algorithms and human intuition and expertise, with each playing a crucial role. It's a fascinating area of ongoing development in the AI field.
LOL---- awesome
 

David L

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The AI Wars Begin, Ai competing against each other. Like VHS vs Betamax, HD DVD vs Blu-ray, who will be the winner/standard?

Maybe the All Knowing AI will split up into specific AI's.

Jack of all trades, master of none
 
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The Ai Wars Begin, Ai competing against each other. Like VHS vs Betamax, HD DVD vs Blu-ray, who will be the winner/standard?

Maybe the All Knowing Ai will split up into specific AI's.

Jack of all trades, master of none
Here is what chat GPT-4 says about your comment:

The concept of "AI Wars" brings up the idea of different AI models or systems competing against each other, analogous to previous technological battles like VHS vs. Betamax or HD DVD vs. Blu-ray. This scenario seems plausible, particularly as AI continues to become more sophisticated and differentiated.
However, it's important to clarify that AI is not a monolithic entity but a field with many different sub-fields, models, and applications. So rather than a single "All Knowing AI" splitting up into specific AIs, it's more accurate to say that various specialized AI models are continually being developed to handle specific tasks. In other words, we already have various 'specific' AIs in areas such as natural language processing, image recognition, autonomous driving, and so on.
In a competition scenario, the "winners" or "standards" would likely be determined by several factors:

  1. Performance: The most obvious factor is how well the AI performs at its intended task. This could be measured in terms of accuracy, speed, versatility, or any other relevant metric.
  2. Adaptability: AIs that can handle a wide range of tasks, or that can easily be adapted for new tasks, will have an advantage. This would favor more general-purpose AIs, or those with good transfer learning capabilities.
  3. Interoperability: AIs that can work well with other systems or technologies may be favored, especially in integrated or complex environments.
  4. Cost-effectiveness: If all else is equal, the less expensive AI will likely prevail. This can include both upfront costs and ongoing costs (like energy usage or maintenance).
  5. Ethics and transparency: As AI becomes increasingly influential, issues related to ethics, privacy, transparency, and explainability will become increasingly important. AIs that handle these issues well may have a competitive advantage.
  6. Regulation: Government regulation could play a significant role in shaping the AI landscape, particularly in sensitive areas like privacy, safety, and fairness.
  7. Public perception and acceptance: The public's view of an AI system can significantly affect its adoption and success. This can be influenced by factors like the system's transparency, the company's reputation, and the perceived usefulness of the AI.
Given the complexity of these factors and the rapid pace of AI development, it's hard to predict which specific models or companies will come out on top. However, it's likely that we'll see continued competition and innovation in the AI field for the foreseeable future.
 

CanCuba

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Professor accuses students of plagiarism by running papers through chatGPT...
Going to start my own AI called 'Scamademia' that specializes in staying ahead of the plagerism checkers.

I remember downloading an essay from an ftp site (pre-web) cerca 1992 and modifying it for my needs. Probably the first kid in my high school to do so. lol
 

David L

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Here is what chat GPT-4 says about your comment:

The concept of "AI Wars" brings up the idea of different AI models or systems competing against each other, analogous to previous technological battles like VHS vs. Betamax or HD DVD vs. Blu-ray. This scenario seems plausible, particularly as AI continues to become more sophisticated and differentiated.
However, it's important to clarify that AI is not a monolithic entity but a field with many different sub-fields, models, and applications. So rather than a single "All Knowing AI" splitting up into specific AIs, it's more accurate to say that various specialized AI models are continually being developed to handle specific tasks. In other words, we already have various 'specific' AIs in areas such as natural language processing, image recognition, autonomous driving, and so on.
In a competition scenario, the "winners" or "standards" would likely be determined by several factors:

  1. Performance: The most obvious factor is how well the AI performs at its intended task. This could be measured in terms of accuracy, speed, versatility, or any other relevant metric.
  2. Adaptability: AIs that can handle a wide range of tasks, or that can easily be adapted for new tasks, will have an advantage. This would favor more general-purpose AIs, or those with good transfer learning capabilities.
  3. Interoperability: AIs that can work well with other systems or technologies may be favored, especially in integrated or complex environments.
  4. Cost-effectiveness: If all else is equal, the less expensive AI will likely prevail. This can include both upfront costs and ongoing costs (like energy usage or maintenance).
  5. Ethics and transparency: As AI becomes increasingly influential, issues related to ethics, privacy, transparency, and explainability will become increasingly important. AIs that handle these issues well may have a competitive advantage.
  6. Regulation: Government regulation could play a significant role in shaping the AI landscape, particularly in sensitive areas like privacy, safety, and fairness.
  7. Public perception and acceptance: The public's view of an AI system can significantly affect its adoption and success. This can be influenced by factors like the system's transparency, the company's reputation, and the perceived usefulness of the AI.
Given the complexity of these factors and the rapid pace of AI development, it's hard to predict which specific models or companies will come out on top. However, it's likely that we'll see continued competition and innovation in the AI field for the foreseeable future.
Wow what a response. Funny but we have a few family members that give long winded responses like this. "I just asked if you like vanilla or chocolate?" LOL They will tell me the percentage of who likes what, the content of each, the health risk of each, etc. LOL

Not putting AI down, just those who control it will be the problem with AI.

Check this Kickstarter out, I almost bought into it...

 

mat200

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Wow what a response. Funny but we have a few family members that give long winded responses like this. "I just asked if you like vanilla or chocolate?" LOL They will tell me the percentage of who likes what, the content of each, the health risk of each, etc. LOL

Not putting AI down, just those who control it will be the problem with AI.

Check this Kickstarter out, I almost bought into it...

Big AI winners so far:
Microsoft, Google, Meta, Nvidia ..

Certainly many more small players ..

AI I can see many customized ChatGPT focused on particular niches .. perhaps we should do one for IPcamTalk .. lol ..


hmmm ..

1685561034721.png
 

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I have attended the Consumer Electronics Show every year for close to thirty years. Four or five years ago it was a novelty to see a robot handling food. That has changed. This year food robots were very well represented. With minimum wages on the rise and the shortage of people to work in the industry, robots may be the future.
 

mat200

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I have attended the Consumer Electronics Show every year for close to thirty years. Four or five years ago it was a novelty to see a robot handling food. That has changed. This year food robots were very well represented. With minimum wages on the rise and the shortage of people to work in the industry, robots may be the future.
Nice, CES I hear was a mad house prior to the Pandemic ..

DO feel free to share any highlights when you go to CES .. I think many here would enjoy your reviews ..
 

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Nice, CES I hear was a mad house prior to the Pandemic ..

DO feel free to share any highlights when you go to CES .. I think many here would enjoy your reviews ..
Yeah, it's always a madhouse. They went virtual for a year during the pandemic but the year after that was great. Very few Chinese vendors plus the isles were wider and about half as many people were there.
 

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I have attended the Consumer Electronics Show every year for close to thirty years. Four or five years ago it was a novelty to see a robot handling food. That has changed. This year food robots were very well represented. With minimum wages on the rise and the shortage of people to work in the industry, robots may be the future.
For companies that need to run and operate, robotics are the only viable option. Because the workforce that is out there is not a option.
 

TonyR

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I find this interesting and somewhat telling...

My question : "When you state that your answers are accurate, how is that accuracy determined?"

 

mat200

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I find this interesting and somewhat telling...

My question : "When you state that your answers are accurate, how is that accuracy determined?"

I heard Reolink is making am AI : ReoGPT to solve everyone's CCTV needs ..
 

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garycrist

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Thank you @wittaj , My position came to an end when the planes flew into the towers. It shut down
the tel-communication and computer industries here in the Dallas Ft. Worth area. No more networks

I learned to drive a truck and went to work for Yellow Transportation moving freight. A climate controlled
environment, heated in the Summer and refrigerated in the Winter. Freakin' kids, walk dogs? What a bunch
of losers!
 
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