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Is this a good enough CAT5e cable?

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I am new to the whole ip camera scene, and am trying to route a few cameras (3-4) around my home, and I just recently purchased a bulk amount of CAT5e cable. I found it very hard to find a cable that was both white/gray, outdoor rated, and had shielding plus pure copper, and also didn't cost me an arm and a leg.

This is what I ended up going with

The cable is UTP, outdoor rated, grayish, and relatively cheap. But I am getting a bit worried, as these cables will run right next to my existing main Ethernet line going to my router, and I did not want to cause any connection slowdowns or interference with that.

Is this cable good enough or do I need to find one that is FTP or STP, and if so, where can I find one that is white or gray, and not super expensive.

Thanks in advance for all the help. All of this is very new to me, I was always under the impression that an Ethernet cable was an Ethernet cable (apart from cat5e-cat6, etc)..until now.
 

Mike A.

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You might be able to get a little better price deal shopping and could go Cat 6 for not much difference in price but looks fine. Don't need to worry about interference from Ethernet cables run together. Even power cables typically not a problem unless it's really nosiy and you're running right next to it for some distance. No way to tell things like whether it's going to pull from the box without kinking and tangling until you run it but has good reviews and I don't see people whining about that kind of thing other than it being a little stiff.
 

TonyR

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That's not bad cable, but I'd suggest this: Monoprice Cat5e Ethernet Bulk Cable - Solid, 350Mhz, UTP, CMR, Riser Rated, Pure Bare Copper Wire, 24AWG, 1000ft, Gray

The one you pointed out is "sunlight-resistant" meaning it is not intended for use in direct sunlight, and it's also not waterproof or for direct burial...and neither is my suggested. Based on what I read provided by your link, I think they should not have used the word "outdoor" anywhere in their description, IMO.

If you plan to use in direct exposure to sunlight and rain, you need a cable designed for that...a CMR-rated cable is OK for indoor use.... in walls, between floors, in crawlspace and attic.

You could run CMR cable under roof overhang, etc. where it's not directly exposed to sun or rain but it's jacket life would be vastly extended by placing it in conduit.....as long as it still is ABOVE ground. That's because over time, indirect UV exposure eventually gets to the jacket. Cable installed in below ground conduit must be rated for direct burial, as water does get into below ground conduit.

Lastly, you can run UTP in proximity to cables carrying 120/240VAC...if running parallel, stay at least 3 feet away and cross line voltage cables ONLY at a right angle.
 
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Holbs

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Running this cable along side other ethernet runs is not a problem. If it was a problem, the entire telecommunication industry would be in a world a hurt :) We have hundreds of cable laying ontop of each other on ladder racking and 2 post racks.
I have run cat5/cat5e/cat6/cat6e along side 110v power all the time (tie wrapping to power conduits down warehouse side walls, for example) with no problems/interference. We certify all of our cables with those $15,000 Fluke certification testers. I would not do such up against 3 phase though. I stay far far away from 3 phase transformers and power.
I initially was going to run cat6 UTP outdoor rated (black coated UV and waterproof resistant) but then realized all cabling will be in EMT conduit so was not needed. Will be doing same as you, running indoor rated cable, but inside conduit. Will last until we all have impenetrable WiFi implanted in our heads.
Finding cat5e/cat6 cabling. Did you try any local telecommunication outfits? We toss out cabling all the time when boxes & reels get around the 150' mark. Could get the stuff for free or couple dollars.
Tony is right. I would never let that cat5e cable your linked above see blue sky. No way I would put that outside without being protected by EMT or PVC conduit. I might have a couple feet exposed if I had to but only if under eaves.
 
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mat200

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I have run cat5/cat5e/cat6/cat6e along side 110v power all the time (tie wrapping to power conduits down warehouse side walls, for example) with no problems/interference. ..
I initially was going to run cat6 UTP outdoor rated (black coated UV and waterproof resistant) but then realized all cabling will be in EMT conduit so was not needed. ...
for those following:
FYI - critical point - the 110v power is in metal conduit. The metal conduit acts as a shield limiting EMI on the cat5e/6 cables
 
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That's not bad cable, but I'd suggest this: Monoprice Cat5e Ethernet Bulk Cable - Solid, 350Mhz, UTP, CMR, Riser Rated, Pure Bare Copper Wire, 24AWG, 1000ft, Gray

The one you pointed out is "sunlight-resistant" meaning it is not intended for use in direct sunlight, and it's also not waterproof or for direct burial...and neither is my suggested. Based on what I read provided by your link, I think they should not have used the word "outdoor" anywhere in their description, IMO.

If you plan to use in direct exposure to sunlight and rain, you need a cable designed for that...a CMR-rated cable is OK for indoor use.... in walls, between floors, in crawlspace and attic.

You could run CMR cable under roof overhang, etc. where it's not directly exposed to sun or rain but it's jacket life would be vastly extended by placing it in conduit.....as long as it still is ABOVE ground. That's because over time, indirect UV exposure eventually gets to the jacket. Cable installed in below ground conduit must be rated for direct burial, as water does get into below ground conduit.

Lastly, you can run UTP in proximity to cables carrying 120/240VAC...if running parallel, stay at least 3 feet away and cross line voltage cables ONLY at a right angle.
Thanks for the replies! Isn't the cable you linked similar to mine? They are both UTP CMR rated. My cables being run will be exposed to both and sun, so I need something that withstand that, which I thought my cable could, but apparently not.
 

mat200

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Thanks for the replies! Isn't the cable you linked similar to mine? They are both UTP CMR rated. My cables being run will be exposed to both and sun, so I need something that withstand that, which I thought my cable could, but apparently not.
Hi @surroundedmoon

imho - off hand the specs look good on that cable. On a quick glance I did not see much about UV exposure rated - so I would check a little more and see if it is.
 

TonyR

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for those following:
FYI - critical point - the 110v power is in metal conduit. The metal conduit acts as a shield limiting EMI on the cat5e/6 cables
I would agree but not sure where I read in this thread that the OP's 110v was in EMT.

Thanks for the replies! Isn't the cable you linked similar to mine? They are both UTP CMR rated.
Yes, it is. Because you asked for advice I linked to a cable that I DID have first hand experience with; yours I did not.

My cables being run will be exposed to both and sun...
What do you mean by "...exposed to both and sun" ? Should that be "both rain and sun"?
 
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I would agree but not sure where I read in this thread that the OP's 110v was in EMT.


Yes, it is. Because you asked for advice I linked to a cable that I DID have first hand experience with; yours I did not.


What do you mean by "...exposed to both and sun" ? Should that be "both rain and sun"?
Yes I meant both rain and sun, as I will be attaching the cables to my home siding, and then running them into the same hole that my router wire uses. For me personally it was most important, that there was no chance of electrical fire or anything like that, and that it did not interfere with my existing Ethernet internet connection, as I rely heavily on that.
 

mat200

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Yes I meant both rain and sun, as I will be attaching the cables to my home siding, and then running them into the same hole that my router wire uses. For me personally it was most important, that there was no chance of electrical fire or anything like that, and that it did not interfere with my existing Ethernet internet connection, as I rely heavily on that.
HI @surroundedmoon

If you have vinyl siding, try running the cable under the siding.
 

mat200

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Oh hmm, would that require me to remove the siding? Sorry I am new to all of this. (also new to owning a home)
Hi @surroundedmoon -

DO see what other members have done with vinyl siding homes. I understand with a little effort you can slip cat5e/6 cables under the siding, yes you'll need to open the siding up a little, but you do not need to remove it from what I understand.

see what @just some dude did for his install ( it looks very nice )
Front door ID camera IPC-HDBW4231F?
 
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Hi @surroundedmoon -

DO see what other members have done with vinyl siding homes. I understand with a little effort you can slip cat5e/6 cables under the siding, yes you'll need to open the siding up a little, but you do not need to remove it from what I understand.

see what @just some dude did for his install ( it looks very nice )
Front door ID camera IPC-HDBW4231F?
Ah ok, I think I see. I was not sure if that was a fire hazard or not. I have not seen what others have done, I will see if I can find some examples.

Would this cablebe better than the one I have for mounting them outside the vinyl?

Also, if I run the cables outside, do I need to ground them?
 

mat200

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Ah ok, I think I see. I was not sure if that was a fire hazard or not. I have not seen what others have done, I will see if I can find some examples.

Would this cablebe better than the one I have for mounting them outside the vinyl?

Also, if I run the cables outside, do I need to ground them?
Hi @surroundedmoon -

Normal UTP cat5e/6 you do not need to ground separately - they will get their ground from the switch ( provided the electrical outlet is grounded ). ( update - see below - ethernet is using transformers to isolate the cable )

Some do go with STP and ground the shielding if they live in an area with lots of lightning. Look for the threads on that if you feel the need to do this.
 
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Dramus

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Ah ok, I think I see. I was not sure if that was a fire hazard or not.
You're talking a lot about "fire hazard." Ethernet, even with PoE, is very low-power. I won't say "impossible," but, IMO the odds of a fault in an PoE cable starting a fire are so exceedingly low as to be non-existent.

The only fire hazard I believe Ethernet cabling could possibly cause is non-riser-rated cable propagating a fire, started by other means, between floors.

Also, if I run the cables outside, do I need to ground them?
Not IMO.

STP is to reduce noise interference, not for safety purposes. It might also reduce the possibility of equipment-killing surges induced into the cable from nearby lightning strikes, (though I wouldn't bet on it), but physically outside as opposed to just inside siding, a wall or a soffit makes little difference there.

Also: Don't worry over much about crossing 125VAC power lines with UTP. Stay away from motors and fluorescent/halogen/LED fixtures. Don't run UTP parallel to power wiring. Otherwise UTP is fairly noise-resistant. You also don't have to worry at all about running UTP parallel to other data cables, such as other UTP cables, antenna coax (non-transmitter), alarm system wiring, etc.

IMO you're over-thinking this. Find a good riser-rated cable (Cat 5E is fine, but Cat 6 is only marginally more expensive, so I'd go with that) and be done with it. I'm running this stuff: Monoprice Cat6 Ethernet Bulk Cable - Stranded, 550Mhz, UTP, CM, Pure Bare Copper Wire, 24AWG, 500ft, Blue because my runs aren't very long, the pulls could've been torturous (stranded tolerates more abuse), and I already had a bag full of RJ-45 connectors for stranded wire.

Which brings up another point: When you buy connectors, make sure you buy connectors suitable for the wire type you're using. And buy a crimper like this: Monoprice Multi-Modular Plug Crimps, Strips, and Cuts Tool [HT-N468B]. It ratchets closed, ensuring a proper connector crimp. One of these can also be handy: VDV LAN Scout Jr. Tester. (I have both of those items in my cable-building toolbox.)

If you have to run cable exposed to sun and weather, which I'd avoid if at all possible--because it looks ugly and is susceptible to vandalism, then you'll need cable appropriately rated for it.

Hi @surroundedmoon -
Normal UTP cat5e/6 you do not need to ground separately - they will get their ground from the switch ( provided the electrical outlet is grounded ).
There is no grounding in a UTP connection, safety or otherwise. All pairs are balanced/differential signalling pairs.

I'm not even certain there's grounding with PoE. My PoE switch, for example, uses a wall wart for the PSU. No ground pin on it.
 
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mat200

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There is no grounding in a UTP connection, safety or otherwise. All pairs are balanced/differential signalling pairs.

I'm not even certain there's grounding with PoE. My PoE switch, for example, uses a wall wart for the PSU. No ground pin on it.
Cool! I learned something new! Thanks @Dramus ( I was incorrect - no grounding in the ethernet cat5e/6 cables... check the following out )

If you just ignore the POE 48 Volts in the image below, you can see Ethernet uses transformers on both sides.

"If you just ignore the POE 48 Volts in the image below, you can see Ethernet uses transformers on both sides... there is no need for common ground as long as the common mode voltage stays below 1500V generally. The isolation specification of the transformers."

and

".. answer is that differential signalling has better SNR than common ground signalling" ( SNR = signal to noise ratio )


Also see the longer explanation

"Why is Ethernet not grounded? There are two reasons:
1. It would create a ground loop between devices
2. The device would also be more susceptible to ESD which is prevalent in cables that are being moved or handled (from triboelectric charging of the cable)

The reason Ethernet is more susceptible to a ground loop is because:
.."


ref: Reply on Stack Exchange
Why is an Ethernet cable not grounded?
 

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