Pandemic threat? Anyone else concerned?

tigerwillow1

Known around here
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
2,183
Reaction score
3,623

Rob2020

Getting comfortable
Joined
Oct 2, 2020
Messages
408
Reaction score
912
Location
OR USA
Why do some nurses speak out against the Covid-19 vaccine mandate?


A total of 5,862 healthcare workers have contracted Covid-19 in New Hampshire since the pandemic began, 87 have been hospitalized and 10 have died, according to state statistics.


Before the story starts let's do a bit of "back of the napkin" math; 5,862 cases and 10 dead

5,862 @ 10% = 586

5,862 @ 1% = 58



But that hasn’t stopped a vocal group of nurses and others in the medical industry from loudly objecting to vaccination requirements, even at the risk of losing their jobs.

The Biden administration is requiring Covid-19 vaccinations of staff at Medicare- and Medicaid-certified facilities to protect them and patients from the virus and its more contagious Delta variant. It has also ordered the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to draft a rule requiring employers with at least 100 workers to force employees to get vaccinated or produce weekly test results showing they are virus free.

Registered nurse Terese Grinnell has been outspoken against Covid-19 vaccination mandates. She previously worked at Concord Hospital, Dartmouth-Hitchcock and the Concord Regional Visiting Nurse Association. She declined to state her present employer, but said she works with critically ill patients.

Grinnell organizes regular protests outside Concord Hospital. She has posted photos of protests involving about a dozen people outside the hospital. Grinnell says other nurses and healthcare professionals join in.

She calls for the impeachment of Republican Gov. Chris Sununu. She reposted an article that compared mask mandates to the Holocaust and included a graphic of syringes formed to shape a Nazi swastika.

Beginning activism

Grinnell said she began her activism after learning a pregnant nursing student was being required to take the inoculation in order to continue her education program.

“I have a lot of friends who are not comfortable with the injection,” she said in an interview. “They’ve seen patients with adverse reactions. It has not been out long enough and many of us lived through Covid outbreaks in the hospital, many of us have had Covid, and it doesn’t make any sense that we would have to put something man-made into our systems and yet we’re losing our livelihoods over it.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the vaccine is safe and effective, the benefits of receiving the vaccination, including during pregnancy, far outweigh extremely rare side effects.

The CDC also says the vaccine was thoroughly researched and tested and is subject to the most intense safety monitoring program in U.S history. It also recommends the vaccine for those who have already had the virus, saying people get better protection by being fully vaccinated.

This advice is supported by the state Department of Health and Human Services, the American Medical Association, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine and the American Nurses Association, among others.

While the vaccine was developed rapidly, efficacy and safety protocols of clinical trials, assessment of data and Food and Drug Administration authorization and approval were followed.

The process was sped by years of experience with similar diseases, decades of research on mRNA technology used in the vaccine, early sequencing of the virus genome, clinical testing stages done in parallel rather than one at time and billions of dollars in government investment, including in manufacturing and distribution. Government red tape was also cut in some instances.

Story Continues
 

tigerwillow1

Known around here
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
2,183
Reaction score
3,623
An example about the press, no covid content. In an article about energy shortages I was starting to believe it until I came across this line:

"The biggest squeeze is on natural gas in Europe, which imports 90% of its supply — largely from Russia — and where prices have risen to five times what they were at the start of the year, to 95 euros from about 19 euros per megawatt hour."

Natural gas priced in electrical units? There are 4 joint authors listed for this article, and it shows that none of them have any knowledge about what they're peddling. This is from the AP, and we get a lot of "expert" covid knowledge from them. Why believe any of it?
Energy crunch hits global recovery as winter approaches

And just to show many "journalists" don't even proofread their output, a Portland, OR outlet has this line today:
"Oregon State Polcie said they were helped by ..........." Even a spell checker catches that one.

(Just my day to rant against the MSM)
 

Rob2020

Getting comfortable
Joined
Oct 2, 2020
Messages
408
Reaction score
912
Location
OR USA
It’s cheap, easy to make and in demand overseas. So why can’t this Texas-born COVID-19 vaccine break into the U.S. market?

The day before COVID-19 claimed its first Texas victim in 2020, Dr. Peter Hotez was a guest on the popular Austin-based podcast “The Drive.”

After 10 years of research into coronavirus vaccines, Hotez and his Houston team needed an infusion of cash to build on their past work and make a vaccine that could, as Hotez told listeners then, “rescue the world” from the deadly emerging coronavirus pandemic.

“You’d think that people would be pretty eager to support us to move this forward, but so far it hasn’t happened,” the Houston pediatrician and vaccine scientist told the host, Dr. Peter Attia, on March 14, 2020.

Story Continues long read

Guess the Dr. needs to check with his Congre$$person or $enator;)
 

bigredfish

Known around here
Joined
Sep 5, 2016
Messages
8,999
Reaction score
20,181
Location
Florida USA


Aside from pain relief, it was found to have anti-platelet and anti-cancer effects. It’s also on the World Health Organization’s list of essential medicines, along with another familiar drug, ivermectin. The Harvard-based physicians’ health study in the 1980s found that low-dose aspirin reduced the risk of heart attack by 44 percent.

A recently published Israeli study found, “Aspirin use is associated with better outcomes among COVID-19 positive patients.” This included a lower likelihood of infection, disease duration, and hospital survival. In other words, aspirin works as both a preventative and as a treatment.

Aspirin is another potential therapeutic, along with hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin, which is inexpensive, readily available, and relatively safe, and could save countless lives when used appropriately for COVID. An editorial in Anesthesia and Analgesiadescribed aspirin for COVID as, “An old, low-cost therapy with a strong rationale.” And right on cue, it’s time for aspirin-bashing to commence.

At the same time as these papers showing potential benefits of aspirin for COVID hit the news, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, on Oct. 12, posted draft recommendations saying that, “Once people turn 60 years old, they should not consider starting to take aspirin because the risk of bleeding cancels out the benefits of preventing heart disease.”

What curious timing.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2017
Messages
6,607
Reaction score
6,645
Location
USA
So now you can get a booster shot of any brand you like. Therefore, if I took Pfizer, I can get Moderna and jump for joy :rofl:
Although there haven't been any extended studies on the long term effects, I hope my sperm remains intact :(
'Gotta stay strong, 'gotta stay together sperm :facepalm:


She sounds hot when she says "Oh my God!" :lol:
 

user8963

Known around here
Joined
Nov 26, 2018
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
1,732
Location
Christmas Island
Top