PoE Switch Suggestion List

Arjun

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Where did you buy your 3560 from? Any difference between the 3560 and 2960? And also, what about noise?


i'm running a 3560 catalyst Layer 3 switch in an offline BI environment. but its in dumb mode. I just need POE power to be solid, 802.3 AT. Theres no way i was doing power injectors all the hell over the Rack.

[TD]WS-C3560X-24P-S[/TD]

[TD]24 PoE+[/TD]

[TD]power supply 715W[/TD]

[TD]Avilable to POE 435W[/TD]

my second redundant power supply is an 1100 watt for the 48 port switch.

$75 ebay
 
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Flintstone61

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Where did you buy your 3560 from? Any difference between the 3560 and 2960? And also, what about noise?
ebay. Greenteksolutions I think.
it's not as noisy as the GawD Awful Nightowl fan. Which i finally replaced with a Noctua.
havent looked at a 2960....but the 3560 boots like a Jet engine take off and settles into a nice hum when it's idling along. Mine is not at home, I migth do what sebastiantombs did for the home setting,
Women get all crazy when they hear gadgets making noise. Yet they can fill all available outlets with air fresheners and 16 Mothertrucking Nightlights staggered thoughout the GD house so Blind Mice can still find the Frosted Flakes box. FFS!
quick ebay search
 
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reflection

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Any difference between the 3560 and 2960?
The 3560 is a layer 3 switch, which means it can do dynamic routing. For example, it will run routing protocols like OSPF, RIP, EIGRP. The 3560 can do everything the 2960 can do and more.

The 2960 is a layer 2 switch. Most consumer switches fall in the layer 2 only category. You may be to do basic static routes. The higher end 2960s will do "IP lite", which includes some basic layer 3 functionality.

For 99% of home users, a layer 2 switch is all you need. The 2960 will let you do VLANs. It also has enterprise features too, which is why most enterprises don't buy consumer switches.
 

Left Coast Geek

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For laughs, I picked up this cheap switch, because the 4 port + uplink POE switch I was using in my home office was out of ports.



been using it for a few months now, so far so good. case gets just warm, not hot.... its running 88 F in a 70F ambient office temp, no fan, not much ventilation, not much air circulation.

I haven't opened it up to see how ugly it is inside.... I suppose I could, hah hah.

ok, ok, I took it apart. exactly what I expected, cheap but decently made, power supply is entirely separate from the switch board. switch board was mounted component side down and I didn't want to unscrew and flip it over, so these pics are it...






and I bolted it back together, plugged it back into my network, waited a minute for everything POE to reboot and reconnect, and all was happy.
 
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karlocikovic

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I bought Tp-Link model TL-SL1311MP , it seems just right for what we need for IP cams.

It has 8× 10/100 Mbps RJ45 POE Ports for cameras (100Mbps is enough for each camera)
2× Gigabit RJ45 Ports, 1× Gigabit SFP Port (2 Gigabit RJ45 ports for connecting on PC or switch)

Works fine for now.

 

Kimco

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Building my first and I'm totally confused trying to understand which POE Switch to get.
I'm not clear on the managed, unmanaged and smart versions. Which one do I need? I want to be able to assign IP's or am I getting that wrong?
I have acreage and a lot of outbuildings with animals, so will be expanding.
Have a pc, 1 camera is coming and will buy Iris.
 
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If you're not comfortable with networking and IP configuration/network protocols go with unmanaged switches and use a second NIC in the Blue Iris machine. The important thing to watch is the power rating, both per port and for the entire switch. Having a switch rated at 30 watts per port with 8 ports and a 60 watt overall power rating doesn't usually work out well. Always buy name brand switches like NetGear, IPCamPower and so on. The low end brands use weak power supplies that might not start back up from a power failure with multiple cameras connected. I stick to multiple 16 port maximum and never load all ports so if there's a failure of a switch I don't loose everything and can move cameras onto the unused ports, temporarily, until I get a replacement.
 

Left Coast Geek

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a managed switch allows you to 'partition' the switch into multiple networks known as VLANs. most IPcam networks just use one network for a whole big batch of cameras, and the camera addresses are all in the same subnet, and are statically assigned per camera when you set the cam up. if you get up over some large number of cams, you'll probably want multiple NVRs and each one would have its own PoE switch, thats much simpler and more robust than messing with VLAN routing.
 

Alaska Country

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With one camera a person could start out with a POE injector. That device will provide 48 VDC for camera power and provide a data path to and from the camera. At less then $10 each it is an inexpensive first step. Camera to injector power/data port (RJ-45) and the other port to the Blue Iris NIC.

POE 48 VDC Injector .PNG

A POE switch would be the next step if you intend to run more than one camera. Here running Dahua cameras on a 24 port unmanaged POE Dahua switch. No need for managed, just keep it simple with a network switch that will provide at least 15 watts per port.
 

Left Coast Geek

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Sorry to barge in with something completely different, but I have a Ubiquiti 24V injector. That can be used with these POE cameras?

those are not standard compliant, and probably won't work with any cameras, UNLESS the camera specifically says it will work with a 'passive' 24V injector. Standard PoE injectors are 48V and meet a IEEE 802.3af or 802.3at standard, the first is 12 watts for PoE, and the 3at is 25 watts for PoE+. AFAIK, most cameras are happy with straight PoE.
 

Alaska Country

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Geek is 100% correct. The Ubiquiti will NOT work for POE IP cams. i.e. 24 VDC vs 48 VDC.

Using one Ubiquiti RF dish system to extent the camera network. It was disappointing that their system will not run at 48 VDC which would make installation easier. At the remote end there is a need for two injectors. One for Ubiquiti at 24 VDC and one for the Dahua camera at 48 VDC. One box for both would have been better.

Using the below for the single remote Dahua camera and so far it it working well.

IPCamPower Mini POE Injector Wall Wart Plug | 802.3at Full 30 watts | Designed for IP Cameras IPCP-MINIINJECTOR-AT

A 4 pack for $30 - perhaps higher priced on Amazon!
 

TL1096r

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A senior member suggested this to me - it seems to have a lot of good features so I wanted to share it:

-16 Gigbit ports
-2 ports are 60w which can be good if you ever acquire a giant 45x PTZ.
-14 ports are 30w
-190w power budget
-competitively priced

If it matters:
-no uplink ports but with 1 gigabit ports it should be fine
-doesn't have a built-in plug
-external power supply
-NOT compatible with Ubiquiti devices which require 24V Passive PoE
 
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