Send internet to wood work shop how to?

CEE

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I have a woodworking shop close to my house it's around 700 yards away with line of sight, it has a upstairs that i sleep at sometimes (the dog house) so it would be great to use Netflix, hulu etc and later put up cameras as i already some around the house. The kids like to play up there as well so they would use the internet.

What would i need to achieve this? My budget is up to $1,000

I read another post about using NanoBeans Gen 2 would these work for me or would another model be better? it says they are rated for 450Mbs so realistically what would they be able to do? They sound hard to aim as there name implies.

I would pole mount them out on the roofs.

My wife says just get a hotspot from verzion, :)

Any advice would be great!
 

CEE

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The Nanobeams would be the easiest, IMHO. Great connectivity and complete electrical isolation.
There is more than one Nanobeams just to be clear it is model NBE-5AC-Gen2,

They look like flood lights.
 

TVille

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The Ubiquiti Nanos would be far better than a hot spot. These things are rock solid, easy to setup, if they are aimed at professionals, and come with unfriendly guides, but you can find plenty of info online on how to set them up, its not hard. Pro tip on setup: Set them BOTH up in your house, right next to each other, get them working before you take them to the field!! Then it is plug and play. You will need a switch/access point at the garage, but with everything you will be a long way under your budget. I have a pair of different Nanos (NsM5), and they just work. I can't tell you which ones to get, as I do not understand the differences between them all.
 

TonyR

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My experience is with the Nano Station Loco M5 as well. I think @TonyR had experience with different models.
I've used probably 6 Loco 5 GHz, about 4 Loco 2.4 GHz, maybe 14 to 16 Nanostation 2.4 GHz units....no Nanostation 5GHz units.
As you know, it just depends on the situation and application.
 
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Well, there's a 60GHz model that would provide 1GHz bandwidth but it's probably pricey. The 5GHz model would probably do the trick. If you're not all that concerned with a super high speed link, say 250-500Mb/s, the Nano Station Loco M5 would work. Be aware you need a pair of them, one at each end. That may be obvious to some, but I just want to cover all bases so there's no surprises.
 

CEE

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All these names are confusing so what would be best for my situation?
 

biggen

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Do you have some networking knowledge? These devices arent plug and play. I mean, you don’t need to have advanced knowledge to set it up, but you need to know a a little about networks to do this.

A hotspot from Verizon (or anyone) would be a heck of a lot simpler.
 

CEE

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Do you have some networking knowledge? These devices arent plug and play. I mean, you don’t need to have advanced knowledge to set it up, but you need to know a a little about networks to do this.

A hotspot from Verizon (or anyone) would be a heck of a lot simpler.
I know to assign them a static IP as i do with my IP cams. I have my DHCP pool set to issue only 50 IP address.

My wife was being sarcastic about verizon. lol

The Loco 5Ghz and nanobeams 5Ghz seem to have the same specs. The locos look to have a wider signal where the nanobeams are more pin point as the name suggest.

Why are the Locos cheaper? Looks like they don't come with a POE brick.

Is there a comparison chart?
 

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I have installed a lot of the air max lately. $49 each
LBE-5AC-US
Has a small dish and will work up to several miles, comes with a POE injector.

The nano beams work well, but you need to provide a 24v POE $67 each

Comparison, you have to dig through them.
 

mikeynags

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I run the Nanobeam Gen2 devices to get the network over to my workshop. Works great and they did come with the POE injectors needed to power them. If you have a little of network skill, you should be able to set them up without issue.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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It was suggested to me to try these. Back when they were $130 bucks. now they've gone crazy trying to get $279 for a pair of preconfigured Nano's. for that Money I would definitely set up an unconfigured pair instead. about 400 feet. link has never gone down. comes back up on its own after a power outage. Never had an issue. I put a 8 channel Amcrest XVR out there set a static IP address of 192.168.1.207 and was able to get the Web UI of the recorder. Then I did an "Add new Camera" twice in BI. .207/Cam1 and .207/ Cam2. works great.
 

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I have a woodworking shop close to my house it's around 700 yards away with line of sight, it has a upstairs that i sleep at sometimes (the dog house) so it would be great to use Netflix, hulu etc and later put up cameras as i already some around the house. The kids like to play up there as well so they would use the internet.

What would i need to achieve this? My budget is up to $1,000

I read another post about using NanoBeans Gen 2 would these work for me or would another model be better? it says they are rated for 450Mbs so realistically what would they be able to do? They sound hard to aim as there name implies.

I would pole mount them out on the roofs.

My wife says just get a hotspot from verzion, :)

Any advice would be great!

For all the members on here that are recommending the Nanobeam range I have nothing but praise for them... Simple to install and just work! I have installed a fair few and they have never missed a beat. You can also configure them for remote managment should you choose which if you have them in different locations makes the managment of these a breeze... Now lets not mention the breach back in Jan Ubiquiti ;)
 

bp2008

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I've installed a lot of point-to-point bridges with Ubiquiti gear. Locos, nanobeams, and bigger stuff. They mostly are very easy to aim such that the link gets established on the very first try and fine-tuning the antenna aiming does not make a significant difference.

The only time I had any trouble with aiming was with a pair of Gigabeam Plus radios just 1-2 weeks ago. Those are 60 GHz radios with a max range of 1.5km and I was installing them 1.2km apart. They could not get a link at all until we carefully re-aligned both ends, but now that the aiming was done, it provides a very stable, very fast connection. The wired LAN at the "remote" end of this bridge has thus far proven less reliable than the wireless bridge.

It isn't even fully fine-tuned on both ends yet and this was a speed test just now.

1626445855512.png1626445906795.png
Receive and transmit speeds are higher when done separately, but even both active at the same time (full duplex) is very good speed considering these radios were only $180 each and they are smaller than a good salad bowl.

1626445820272.png
 

TonyR

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They could not get a link at all until we carefully re-aligned both ends, but now that the aiming was done, it provides a very stable, very fast connection.
Logic tells me both radios MUST be installed on a mechanically stable, sturdy mount and location. Of course, that applies to all radios but when the beam width is so narrow and proper alignment is so important one wouldn't want them to be too easily knocked out or degraded.
 

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I've installed a lot of point-to-point bridges with Ubiquiti gear. Locos, nanobeams, and bigger stuff. They mostly are very easy to aim such that the link gets established on the very first try and fine-tuning the antenna aiming does not make a significant difference.

The only time I had any trouble with aiming was with a pair of Gigabeam Plus radios just 1-2 weeks ago. Those are 60 GHz radios with a max range of 1.5km and I was installing them 1.2km apart. They could not get a link at all until we carefully re-aligned both ends, but now that the aiming was done, it provides a very stable, very fast connection. The wired LAN at the "remote" end of this bridge has thus far proven less reliable than the wireless bridge.

It isn't even fully fine-tuned on both ends yet and this was a speed test just now.

View attachment 95367View attachment 95368
Receive and transmit speeds are higher when done separately, but even both active at the same time (full duplex) is very good speed considering these radios were only $180 each and they are smaller than a good salad bowl.

View attachment 95366
Sweet, I have been wanting to do a 60g link. Wonder how the 5g radios work, and what they do? Fog/rain fade backup?

We stuck an Air fiber up AF5 the other day, had 1G service on one end, and 1G on the other end. It worked great!
Just glad I did not have to pay the bill.
 
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