Which ethernet cable would be best ?

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A80CA755-0032-4CD4-A588-261CBF5277D4.png 4814EFC6-3381-42B4-98FB-10F4F2C09866.png It would be mostly be ran indoors in an existing home. However, I plan on running 2-3 cameras about 200 ft to a freestanding garage. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated.
 

Walrus

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The first one from Monoprice is stranded. You want solid. And why buy 1000ft of gel filled outdoor cable for indoors? Also is outdoor CMR or CMP rated for use in walls?
 

bp2008

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That first cable looked drastically overpriced anyway. You can get cat5e if cat6 is too expensive, unless for some reason you want to use the cable for 10 gigabit networking later. Which is unlikely. If you wanted to do 10 Gbps networking I wouldn't even recommend just cat6 ;)
 

Holbs

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Jumping in 2 weeks late...but...
if you know the rough footage that you require, probably cheaper to call upon local voice/data vendors in your area and purchase a specific length rather than just buying 1000' of something and have too much extra.
 
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Good choice, but if you're not in immediate need, better to wait 'till Black Friday / Cyber Monday. I picked up the same type and length for $74.99 last year. Regular price was $89.99. There was a $15 coupon available at the time.

i didn't see a big difference in price from cat 5e so went with this:
 

ANTH040

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I have bought any cabels and all my cameras are working fine? Whats the difference? Does it matter as long as they are working? Feeling a bit paranoid about what I have got now. Last ones I got were these Ethernet.
 

TonyR

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I have bought any cabels and all my cameras are working fine? Whats the difference? Does it matter as long as they are working? Feeling a bit paranoid about what I have got now. Last ones I got were these Ethernet.
The images shown appears to be copper, not CCA (Copper Clad Aluminum) so that's a good thing, but they're patch cables and they are stranded, you want solid for use in walls and between floors. And the cable's jacket for said use (in walls, between floors, attics, crawl spaces) should be rated CMR (at least) or CMP.

Do the cables you linked have any jacket ratings printed on them that you are aware of?

You've been a member of this forum since Oct. 2015 are you're asking "...Whats the difference? Does it matter as long as they are working?" ......?

You're joking, right? :wtf:
 

ANTH040

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Do the cables you linked have any jacket ratings printed on them that you are aware of?

You've been a member of this forum since Oct. 2015 are you're asking "...Whats the difference? Does it matter as long as they are working?" ......?

You're joking, right? :wtf:
I am not joking I have been a member that long but only recently been checking the forum as I have bought blue iris since then and upgraded my very old cameras to me the only difference was cat cable was 5 and 6.

I have no idea what the difference with all this patch utp etc like I said mine are working no matter what I have bought. I have some other cameras on low profile wires.

So whats the negatives/positives of buying pretty much anything?

mine run straight from the switch outside and around the house wall.

Markings on mine are

e255388 9j awm 2835 24awg tia/eia cat 6 utp patch rohs

and

5688.2 eia/tia cat6 low which were these Ethernet cabels
 
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IAmATeaf

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Most patch cables aren’t really rated for external use. If the only part of the cable outside is a few inches at the junction box where it exits the wall then you should be fine but if you’ve run then outside along walls then provided they are in conduit again, hopefully you should be OK.

For my house, I’ve not used cat6 but did use external grade cat5e for all runs regardless of internal or external.
 
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Another difference between a patch cable and regular UTP is that a patch cable is, generally, stranded wire. That can present a problem if you need to re-terminate, put a new RJ45, on. For best practice and performance in that case you need an RJ45 made for stranded cable. Then there's the problem of patch cables not being UV rated or CMR rated. Yes, they're nice and flexible but there are costs for that.

In terms of bandwidth capability, I see no point in going to CAT6 or higher. CAT5E is fine unless, somehow, camera technology somehow needs over a gigabit and hard drives increase dramatically in size and their price drops through the floor. In that case, fiber would be the best choice.
 

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My mind's on several other things, right now, but I'll try to do a context switch and come up with a reasonably useful answer for you, @ANTH040.

Bottom line: Pretty much any quality Cat 5e or better cable will do for IP cams. Exceptions are if you're going to bury it, run it though plenum spaces or expose it to outdoors/sunlight. Then it has to be rated for those uses. Many recommend that for longer runs, particularly that run outdoors, you should use shielded cable. (The thinking is mainly for nearby lightning strike mitigation. I'm not certain it matters, but it can't hurt and it might help.)

Most any modern, quality Ethernet cable will be rated to meet or exceed NEC requirements for in-wall and crawl space installation. But check the cable's rating. (If you can't find the rating, I would not recommend using it.)

As for stranded vs. solid: Solid is less expensive and takes up a lot less space in bundles. It also suffers less voltage drop over longer runs, which is important in PoE applications. Conversely: Stranded has higher pull strength and is generally more tolerant of the abuse to which cable may be subjected while being pulled.

Connectorization: The connectors have to match the cable being used. There are differences between stranded and solid wire connectors, between shielded and un-shielded connectors, and between connectors at different category levels. (You can use Cat 6 connectors on cat 5 cable, but not vice-versa.) Make sure the use the proper connectors and that you crimp them properly. (A "ratcheting" crimp tool is recommended to help ensure this.)

Hope this helps. (And, yes, it's true: I did used to do this kind of thing for a living. For better than 25 years, in fact.)
 

ANTH040

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Thanks for taking the time to explain. Mine are outside and run a long the walls which will be exposed to the sunlight they have been working for 4 years so far :)
 

larryhagman

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Useful thread and a great post by Dramus - thanks for that.

I am setting up a new system and was advised by CCTV firm that Cat6 is what they recommend. "Course it is!" I thought. I popped on here to see if this had been discussed and looks like it has. So Cat5E is still perfectly adequate even for Hikvision 8mp cameras? If so, I could save a few bucks there. I have already bought connectors and crimps! Doh! I had no idea they differ, in fact I had no idea about stranded v solid. I better get reading up on this, I need some cable asap.
 

larryhagman

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Having said that, not much difference in price.



Seems a no brainer to go for cat6 if that close in price?
 

Dramus

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Thanks for taking the time to explain. Mine are outside and run a long the walls which will be exposed to the sunlight they have been working for 4 years so far :)
You're welcome.

Sure: They'll work--until they don't any more ;) Degradation due to environmental exposure isn't an overnight thing. It's a steady progression that's mostly invisible--until it's not. They're already there and working, so I guess you might as well leave them. But don't be surprised when they eventually fail.

Useful thread and a great post by Dramus - thanks for that.
You're welcome.

Having said that, not much difference in price.
...
Seems a no brainer to go for cat6 if that close in price?
I would. Just make certain you use Cat6 connectors designed for solid wire.

In running the cable take care to avoid pulling hard on it, bending it tightly around corners, and especially take care that you don't ever let it kink. Leave a couple feet of spare cable at or near each end (referred to as a "service loop") in case you ever have to re-connectorize. Do not tightly-coil the service loops.

When terminating the ends you should have to push the cable into the connectors fairly firmly to get all the conductors fully into position. Otherwise you may find the jacket "shrinking back" from the connector over time. It's a bit of an art, getting them just right, that's only learned with trial and error experience.

The way I've found works best for me is to expose more of the individual wires than necessary, straighten them out, line them up in order next to one another, pinched between thumb and forefinger, trim them straight and even with a good pair of small diagonal cutters, then carefully insert into the connector all in one go. Monoprice sells some connectors that are particularly easy to terminate because they come with integral wire looms that you place over the conductors, in order, then trim and insert.

I use a relatively inexpensive cable tester that tells me my pairs are all terminated in the correct order. Proper CatN cable testers are prohibitively expensive, IMO, even for a network geek like me. As a substitute I hook my laptop up to the far end, run a bandwidth test using iperf, then examine network interface error counters at each end.

Go slow, take your time, make sure you've got it right. A bit of care and attention at installation will ensure years of trouble-free network runs :)
 
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larryhagman

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What a great post, thank you very, very much.

I don't have any kind of tester, I could get a cheap one, but I will no doubt take 30 minutes to panic and fuss until I finally crimp :D. I am sure i will get there. I just need to check I have the right order (never crimped ethernet cables before), and I also need to get some connectors as I rushed into buying some cat5e ones which I dont think will be suitable. I definitely plan to take my time and get it right.

Some of my cables will run alongside 240v power cable. I know thats bad, so I would usually wrap in tin foil (seriously :D) but I wonder if I bought shielded cable if that would help, i cant run it any other way except right alongside power cable unfortunately.
 
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