Which ethernet cable would be best ?

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No need to blush. Asking what you don't know is a sign of intelligence to me. Hell, I ask questions too :D because learning never stops, well there is an end but I want to ignore that, especially today.

You were talking about shielded ethernet cable. Typically, the shields would be bundled together at the network switch end, in a network closet, and a heavy gauge ground wire, say 14 gauge or larger, would be connected to them and the local ground connection in the network closet. It's a little tougher in a residential setting and best practice would be a very large wire, at least 6 gauge, running out to the ground rod for the electrical service to provide a local ground at the network switch. There should only be one ground point for any electrical system.
 

larryhagman

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Interesting stuff, and thanks for the patience and understanding.

So I have a copper ground stake (for electric fencing), so I just need to attach the foil shielding to a wire, soldered ideally, and connected to a stake like that which goes into the ground. And I assume this is so that, if lightning hit the cable, it will follow the shortest path to ground, which just so happens to not include a path through my $600 NVR :D. That sound about right?!!

I am choosing between :

1. kenable External SHIELDED CAT5e Outdoor COPPER Ethernet Cable FTP Reel 305m: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

2. kenable External SHIELDED CAT6 Outdoor Use COPPER Ethernet Cable FTP Reel 305m: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

I have absolutely no need for the extra speeds of Cat6, and never will have. but I do want a long-life cable. It's easy to say it's just $20 more so why not, but I have been doing that for a week now (cameras/nvrs/cable...) and I found it makes a friggin HUGE difference when the fat lady sings :D. So, 5e is ample speed. It's shielded. Think I will go for that unless I am missing something. Also that heavier cat6 looks a bitch to crimp and route everywhere. stiff/thick stuff. I assume the cat5e (no. 1) cable can be grounded, just pull out a load of foil and ground that? thanks v much guys

Edit - they sell on ebay, and as usual a few more bucks savings that way - External Outdoor Cat5E FULL COPPER Network Ethernet Cable FTP/UTP Reel Lot Cat5 | eBay
 

Dramus

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You were talking about shielded ethernet cable. Typically, the shields would be bundled together at the network switch end, in a network closet, and a heavy gauge ground wire, say 14 gauge or larger, would be connected to them and the local ground connection in the network closet.
Silly me, but I thought you simply terminated them with the appropriate connectors and plugged 'em into the switches. (Like I wrote, earlier, I've no experience with STP wiring.)

It's a little tougher in a residential setting and best practice would be a very large wire, at least 6 gauge, running out to the ground rod for the electrical service to provide a local ground at the network switch.
6 ga. would be kind of large, ISTM.

There should only be one ground point for any electrical system.
Most definitely.

Here's another thought, but it might be kind of expensive: Fiber for the back-haul. Solves both the grounding and lightning issues. If I had to do what the OP is doing, the way he insists on doing it, I think I'd go with fiber and damn the cost.
 

larryhagman

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This is probably a very dumb post but I am gonna risk embarassing myself....

I am in UK. I know our wiring system is different here. Is there still a need to ground the RJ45 shielding even on UK systems where are mains sockets are earthed? I assume so, for the lightning strike if nothing else, but just wanted to check in case the UK/USA differences are relevant. Also - i notice on the back of the Hikvision NVRs there is a "ground" contact. I don't know what that's for exactly, our mains plugs are earthed anyway, so maybe thats just for US purchasers to ground the power supply?
 

Dramus

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This is probably a very dumb post but I am gonna risk embarassing myself....
Not to worry. It's not a dumb question.

I am in UK. I know our wiring system is different here. Is there still a need to ground the RJ45 shielding even on UK systems where are mains sockets are earthed?
Common residential outlets have been equipped with grounding connections here in the U.S. since the mid-to-late 60's. Different plug, voltage, and frequency, but same result.

I assume so, for the lightning strike if nothing else, ...
That's why. To give the energy somewhere to go other than your house wiring. Not that it necessarily won't go there, anyway. Lightning is pernicious.
 

larryhagman

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Thanks!

If I had a house, I would be grateful :D. we live in a trailer, and it's not connected to this stuff at all. But the NVR will be, along with my workshop tools etc, so well worth protecting all the same!

"Common residential outlets have been equipped with grounding connections here in the U.S. since the mid-to-late 60's" - Damn am I really getting that old?!! And bang goes my image of you yanks loving to take risks unlike these limey fellers. :D
 

larryhagman

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Would something like this be advisable or at least of some use?
 

larryhagman

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I spoke to a cable supplier, who did the usual "Cat6 would be better for your needs" without giving me any explanation of "better", and when I asked they shrank into their shell as so often happens in such situations. It tires me out chopping through the BS to get real info when buying things these days. But enough of my manic depression....

Another cable supplier also said (when i asked about crimp connectors for cat6 cable, which I am no longer planning on buying as I am going for Cat5E now) - "its not recommended to crimp this style cable. The correct way to terminate is use face-plates either side and then have pre-made cables connect from the face plate to your device and router. The reason for this is solid core cable is not guaranteed a secure connection when crimping ends onto it. To crimp you should use stranded cable, the teeth in the crimp glide through the strands and you always have a solid contact. "

I take it this same comment would apply to Cat 5E cable with solid copper conductors - which is exactly what I am planning on buying. Faceplates etc are not an option here. Could anyone confirm that they have crimped connectors onto RJ45 cable with solid copper wire rather than stranded, and have everything working ok? I have bought crimps, just need to find connectors for solid copper, but what this guy said has given me another worry. Or did what he said somehow only apply to Cat6?

Thanks
 
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That crimping thing is just another line of BS, Larry. I have crimped tens of thousands of solid cables with no problems. I've also crimped many thousands of stranded cables with no problems, using the appropriate RJ connectors for each, of course. CAT6, CATsmix, wire is wire but, with CAT6, you do want to be more careful to maintain the twist of each pair right into the connector for minimum loss and throughput. It's all technique and if you haven't ever crimped any plan on practicing a bit so buy way more connectors than you need to allow for that. I still say a Loco would do you very well and save you time and heartaches like this kind of BS as well.
 

Dramus

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I still say a Loco would do you very well and save you time and heartaches like this kind of BS as well.
By "Loco" you mean a wireless back-haul using purpose-built hardware, and I of course agree, but still he'll probably need to learn to fabricate cables.
 

Dramus

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Actually, he could easily use some premade cables and save the cost of a decent quality crimper and a cable tester.
True. I wouldn't, because I don't like a lot of spare cable hanging around. Just the length needed + adequate service loop. I'm a bit of a neat freak where cabling is concerned :) My bigger issue with the airborne run is the lightning hazard. That's going to be a big ol' long antenna just begging for trouble, IMO. Heck, I don't even like the stuff I have laying up in the attic crawl space, but I had no other reasonable way to do it.
 

larryhagman

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hehe. Ye have little faith, lightning will never get me. BANG. :D

Loco and wireless solutions are not for me. I do want to do my own cables and been meaning to learn for ages, I am a bit of an anal retentive too and I love the idea of making cables myself just the right length (plus 'service loop'). I have the crimpers now. just need to find some connectors which will be good for solid copper conductors and I am good to go. :)
 

Dramus

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hehe. Ye have little faith, lightning will never get me. BANG. :D
You do understand that for lightning to destroy your electronics, possibly at both ends, it doesn't have to hit the cable directly, right? It just has to strike "near enough." ("Near enough" is highly variable, so I cannot put a number on it.) The longer and higher the "antenna" you're stringing, the farther away and smaller the lightning strike need be to give you a very bad day.

And, yes: I'm trying to dissuade you from this course or action, despite your insistence on pursuing it, as I feel it's a pretty bad idea. At least explore the feasibility of using fiber instead of copper.
 

larryhagman

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I appreciate that, and your concern. The wire is strung high up, but lower than many other things around it (including higher wires). I understand there is a risk, but I don't think it's as bad as I perhaps led you to believe. thanks :)
 

larryhagman

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I am ordering cat5e shielded cable with solid conductors. The company I am ordering from KEEP saying you shouldn't crimp solid copper, only stranded. What are the opinions here on this? Surely with care and attention to detail, plus a continuity test, it should be fine? Do people here crimp solid cable?
thanks
 
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I've crimped, literally, thousands of solid cables with RJ45s with no problems at all. Just get RJ connectors made for solid wire, there is a difference in how they actually make contact with the conductors between one for solid and one for stranded.
 

larryhagman

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Thanks, that's what i hoped to hear! Yes I have seen the different types, I am ordering ones for solid wire. Thanks again
 

Sybertiger

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I've crimped, literally, thousands of solid cables with RJ45s with no problems at all. Just get RJ connectors made for solid wire, there is a difference in how they actually make contact with the conductors between one for solid and one for stranded.
For solid or stranded wire? To me they "look" like they are for solid wire...three prong looking at the magnified image.


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I don't use, and have no experience with, the pass through connectors. I'm "old school" and use the dead front ones to this day. After a little learning curve, I can even do them perched on a ladder in the rain.
 
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