Wireless HDMI

dudemaar

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eggsan

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Is that your only option? Do you have an ethernet cable available between the intended placement location (source-to-display)? My experience with wireless transmitter is not 100% reliable, but that may also be related to the construction materials used in my Country (cement walls with steel bars). As they said with cameras, better use wired than wireless. There are many wired HDMI transmitter options, but if budget is crucial, I tested the Mirabox HSV891. You may used one transmitter to a single receiver, or one transmitter to multiple receiver. For multiple receivers, better used a dedicated gIgaswitch for the hdmi network)


Mirabox: HSV891 HDMI Over Lan Extender With Audio Extractor
 

Optimus Prime

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@eggsan Is this the same as HDMI over IP? Someone once told me they can reach their HDMI source in the network rack from any TV in house. I’ve been looking to replicate but can’t seem to find an affordable solution. It would be great to leave the TIVO and the Antenna connections in the rack.
 

eggsan

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yes, it is hdmi over ip. I prefer the Vanco brand, but price is considerable higher. I installed the Mirabox about 2 years ago, an still works fine. Remember, if you have two or more sources for distribution around the house, the options could be more complicated/expensive. That means you may need a matix switch with several inputs (sources) and multiple outputs (rooms). The Mirabox solution could handle from a single input (tivo) to multiple (tv's) outputs, just by adding multiple receivers (remember using a gigaswitch cat5/6 to all room, in that particular network). Let's say all tv's watch tivo in hdmi-1. If you need add cable to all rooms, technically adding a separate Mirabox network (one transmiter to multiple receivers/rooms), using a separate gigaswitch, an using hdmi-2 for watching cable, should work. You still need to figure out a way to change channels via IR receivers (normally a matrix switch takes care of this task). Not sure if Mirabox have another model which includes IR control over the same cable (I included a video from a different brand, but no experience with it). Let me know if you have any question, but I will recommend to keep it simple. Just start with a couple units (tivo for two rooms + ir control)

Good luck.

Mirabox;
another brand with IR, good source of general info:
 

concord

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I used to use something like this, it broadcasted near 2.4Ghz, when I had a Dish receiver that had two tuners in it. Used it to broadcast to the bedroom, but it was very finicky, especially if someone used the microwave :). It was about 36ft away, going thru 2 inside walls. Hopefully they've improved the range and included better filtering. But only costed about 40.00 back then and had composite and component only.
 

eggsan

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yes, I purchased a 2.4Ghz TX/RX at Radio Shack back in the 90's. Same problem, interference while operating the microwave oven. Inexpensive 5.8Ghz with component video IN/OUT are still available, but made sure your cable/satellite box have component video output (Dish, besides HDMI, still may include component output). Based in your answer, it means your only option is a wireless solution. Check the reviews for the following item with HDMI output. With Amazon, you still have the option of returning the product.

 

DsineR

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HDCP will not allow for analog connections (video, component, etc), will have to go digital for the satellite & cable tuner outputs.
For extending the HDMI signal, I recommend a CAT6 Tx & Rx between the tuner & TV. The CAT6 is a dedicated run, to carry the HDMI signal. Note that this is not an IP solution, no codecs involved.
The higher end models will do up to 4K 4:4:4 & HDCP compliant - check Crestron, Extron, Kramer.
 

eggsan

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Of course, there are extremely high-end solutions for transporting HDMI signals over IP networks, it all depends on how much money you are willing to expend. To avoid conflict between network traffic, you need to use a separate dedicated unmanaged gigabit switch, connected over an independent network. You don't need to worry about HDCP if transmitting wireless analog component signals, but only if your sources (some cable/satellite boxes and media players) have component output. Composite signals should be avoided for picture quality.
 

Mark_M

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@fenderman mentioned this device in: Craziness ..... Convert IP camera to NTSC analog video?
If no Ethernet runs are available in the situation this might be an idea. Obviously it depends on weather there's TV aerial/coax lines.



One device that can broadcast to any tv connected. No receiver devices.
This example can display multiple tv channels with different streams.

There's also other versions of these 'tv modulators' that take an [HDMI / VGA / Composite / etc] source in.
 
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