AI Cameras for Community Security

mat200

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I was thinking like a kind of informal watch security between neighbors, outside HOA administration. Will all participants have access to the live video, recorded material, centralized recorder (NVR), etc.
Good questions ..

Personally I've seen too many Karen's in powerful positions at HOAs that I think finding a balance with security cameras access is important.

Also have to take into account issues within the community and families.

Domestic violence, restraining orders, cheating spouses, neighbors kids driving in ways that make Karens unhappy ..

The question is how to keep everything within a balance that stops the security cameras from creating more drama ?
 

eggsan

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Good questions ..

Personally I've seen too many Karen's in powerful positions at HOAs that I think finding a balance with security cameras access is important.

Also have to take into account issues within the community and families.

Domestic violence, restraining orders, cheating spouses, neighbors kids driving in ways that make Karens unhappy ..

The question is how to keep everything within a balance that stops the security cameras from creating more drama ?
Yes, is true, but my thinking as a micro regarding a “community surveillance”, is like a “venture” between several neighbor’s, to invest/install in cameras at certain areas which could compromise the security between them (crossing between patios, suspects cars, etc.). Could be an street with only one exit, with probably no more than 10 houses. But then, should all have access to the live view, or a method of communicating in case of suspicion, or even calling the police in real emergency? A siren could be too annoying, especially during nighttime, but I believe installing several flood-lights could be a real deterrent for the potential intruders. Even the cameras could “start” a sequential lightning scenery between different houses (porch’s), using today’s AI detection, combined with smart switches (scenes).
 

H. Swanson

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This is changing now - Dahua is in process of releasing AcuPick 2.0 - where functions of Video MetaData (describing people/cars by attributes and allow to search by them) are combined with AcuPick in one system...

in 5-series (where we have from a few weeks new firmware) AcuPick 2.0 creates a lot attributes for people, but for cars are only color for now. In next month there should be a new firmware for 7-series where all attributes for human and cars will be available.

AcuPick processing is done locally (no cloud) and divided is between cam and NVR.

Those functions works best where is one central NVR, which integrates all cameras.

It can be done with many NVR but if You want one central interface which works for all cameras, You need use Dahua server software called DSS Server - which in basic version (express) is free but for all AI features You must pay not cheap license for full version.
I've enabled Acupick 2.0 and now have the metadata enabled, but how do I mark an image as a false positive? For example, a tree being tagged as a human.

Edit: Nevermind. I figured out how to add content to the Experience Database so it'll learn.
 
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I have been asked to seek out some recommendations for security cameras for our community crime watch organization. Initially, we want to cover traffic in both directions on the two roads that lead into the area (so 4 cameras total). We were first targeting cameras and systems with LPR (such as Turing) which allow AI searching of the recorded videos. More recently it was decided that it would be enough if we can retrieve vehicle information (type, color, make, etc.) and possibly driver images. AI search is still a necessity as our area has a lot of "weekend" homes where people might not come for a month or longer, and visually searching through that much video would be impossible. There is a reluctance to go with Chinese systems (Dahua, Hikvision, etc.) due to security risks with those.

Cameras will be mounted at locations occupied by active community members, so using PoE is very likely. One question is whether a single NVR at a central location (the community center), with cameras forwarding to it, would work, or if we will want an NVR at each location where the cameras are located. (There is 100/100mbps fiber internet available). Our initial budget is limited to around $7000, but if we can spend less that's no problem. :)

Doing online searches for things such as "best security cameras" just leads to mostly biased "review" sites that are just marketing gimmicks. I was happy to come across this community where I can hear opinions from knowledgeable users. I look forward to your thoughts, and let me know if you need any further information or have any questions for me.
As to the "security risks" with Dahua/Hikvision... you counteract that by not allowing the cameras to access the internet. Don't let them "phone home". Do this at the router level or switch level. The forum has lots of info on creating a separate Vlan or otherwise isolating the cameras to ONLY allow them to access the NVR or BI Server. Isolating cameras is really best practice for ALL cameras regardless of who makes them.
 

tech_junkie

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I have been asked to seek out some recommendations for security cameras for our community crime watch organization. Initially, we want to cover traffic in both directions on the two roads that lead into the area (so 4 cameras total). We were first targeting cameras and systems with LPR (such as Turing) which allow AI searching of the recorded videos. More recently it was decided that it would be enough if we can retrieve vehicle information (type, color, make, etc.) and possibly driver images. AI search is still a necessity as our area has a lot of "weekend" homes where people might not come for a month or longer, and visually searching through that much video would be impossible. There is a reluctance to go with Chinese systems (Dahua, Hikvision, etc.) due to security risks with those.

Cameras will be mounted at locations occupied by active community members, so using PoE is very likely. One question is whether a single NVR at a central location (the community center), with cameras forwarding to it, would work, or if we will want an NVR at each location where the cameras are located. (There is 100/100mbps fiber internet available). Our initial budget is limited to around $7000, but if we can spend less that's no problem. :)

Doing online searches for things such as "best security cameras" just leads to mostly biased "review" sites that are just marketing gimmicks. I was happy to come across this community where I can hear opinions from knowledgeable users. I look forward to your thoughts, and let me know if you need any further information or have any questions for me.
A Ubiquity wireless trunk system will work, just have to know what size and location install constraints.
But Ideally you should run the ip cameras off an ubiquity wireless system that lands into the camera port of an NVR and use the NVR as the media server for internet viewing.

so the flow diagram of the camera system should look like this, I'll use some IP address schemes that are common with Hikvision camera (192.168.254.xxx) and Netgear internet router (192.168.0.xxx)
For each camera location:

IP camera (192.168.254.02)->POE switch-Ubiquity wireless (192.168.254.60 DHCP OFF for one location, I like to set my ip addresses for wireless bridge nodes in increments of 10, so the next Ubiquity bridge node would have an IP of 192.168.254.70 ) (in point to point mode signed in to the wireless station)

at the base station:
Ubiquity wireless station -(in point to multi point mode address set at 192.168.254.50 DHCP off) -> any Camera input on the NVR (192.168.254.1) -> NVR connected to network by its network/LAN port (192.168.0.33)
If you ever run across a camera that needs the DHCP, you would either enable the one in the NVR or in the Ubiquity base station if the NVR doesn't have one but I never see the need for DHCP as assigning the camera a static IP is the standard affair and never installed a camera commercially by DHCP.
 
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