Best Cat6 cable for my system?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Saltman, Jun 10, 2019.

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  1. Saltman

    Saltman Young grasshopper

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  2. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    I do not recommend running stranded conductor patch cables in walls and between floors, not even those of such good quality as those you linked to. That is not their purpose. They are for the interconnection of network device in closets, living spaces and don't belong in walls, attic, crawl space on between floors as you run the risk of the outer jacket not rated for such application. A conductor insulation or cable insulation not rated for the application may allow flame to spread to other spaces even if it's not the source of ignition.

    If you plan on running in-wall, attic, crawl space on between floors you want a solid copper, non-CCA (Copper Clad Aluminum), solid (not stranded) conductor CAT-5e or CAT-6 with a jacket rated CMR (Riser) or better (CMP, plenum). The CMP-rated (plenum) cable can be used in wall (riser) but not vice-versa.

    Granted, you will have to install your own RJ-45's with a crimper but it's not rocket science and you can drill a 3/8" hole, not a 5/8".

    I used this monoprice CAT-6 / 23 gauge last time with their 2-piece RJ-45 staggered connector and it's not so bad if you employ this technique.
     
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  3. Hammerhead786

    Hammerhead786 Young grasshopper

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    ^^What TonyR says. Stranded cable is for connecting between devices as they are quite flexible. Solid cable is for running in walls and between floors.
     
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  4. TekAssistant

    TekAssistant n3wb

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    TonyR is correct, of course - excellent information.

    I ran over 7,000 feet of this stuff with absolutely no issues. TrueCable CAT6 CMP 23AWG
    I also like that the twisted pair coloring on this cable is easier to see than others; this is especially useful in a dark environment.
    (CMP) is designed for use in "plenum" spaces, where it has direct contact with HVAC, air ducting, etc. CMP cable jackets are designed to NOT release noxious fumes like other plastic cable jackets.

    I personally use these tools anytime cable needs to be run and/or terminated:
    1. Platinum Tools 100061C EXO Crimp Frame w/ EXO-EX Die Set for ezEX-RJ45
    2. Platinum Tools 202044J RJ45 Connectors / Jar of 100
    3. Cyclops UTP/STP Cable Jacket Stripper
    4. Klein Tools Cable Snips
    Not the cheapest but I can terminate very fast using this combination.

    In regards to crimping the connectors:
    If using the Platinum Tools connectors or any other RJ45 connector, just remember to keep the clip side down when you're setting the cable for EIA/TIA 568B color coding. OW/O/GW/Bl/BlW/G/BrW/Br
    Also, make sure that the cable jacket is properly seated inside of the connector as there is a plastic piece that will push down onto the jacket to hold it into place.
    DO THIS
    [​IMG]
    image credit: stackexchange (gregmac)

    I would also recommend setting up a cheap keystone patch panel somewhere near your router and/or switch. Doing so makes it much easier to make device or routing changes in the future and creates a more permanent solution.
    1. This would attach to the wall and allow you to mount the keystone patch panel
    2. This would attach to the wall mount and allow keystone jacks to be inserted
    3. CableMatters CAT6 Keystone Jack / Pack of 25
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  5. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    You got it, my man. And a GOOD picture "says" it all:

    RJ45-Pinout-T568B_med.jpg
     
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  6. Kisch

    Kisch n3wb

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    Use 23AWG pure copper bare wire. It is best for POE. And UV resistant for(if) outdoor use.
     
  7. DigitalKloc

    DigitalKloc n3wb

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    If you are going to be crimping your own connectors, get CAT6 instead of CAT6A. The wires are a lot easier to crimp. Also, you don’t need the speed of CAT6 since the cameras encode the video on the camera side and send compressed video over the network. It’s not a lot of traffic per camera and the cameras only have a 10/100 network port.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
  8. Mikk36

    Mikk36 n3wb

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    Is even CAT6 necessary?
    What's the reasoning for the extra shielding, cost and harder installation, if all you really need is 100 Mbps (though CAT5e is capable of 1000 Mbps)? I'm guessing he's not going for 100 m / 330 ft runs when he was considering 7ft cables.
    Another thing is that the CAT5e rated jacks are easier to install.

    Also, it doesn't matter if you're using T568A or T568B standard, as long as you're using the same one everywhere.
    Lately the A variant seems to be more popular over here.
     
  9. TonyR

    TonyR IPCT Contributor

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    Perhaps not but it can be had in 23 AWG which can help long POE runs to higher current draw devices.

    No one mentioned "shielding"; standard CAT-6 is NOT shielded although it can be an option, as with CAT-5e.

    Those were STRANDED PATCH cables which he was advised NOT to run in walls, attic, crawl spaces. He was advised to run solid copper, non-CCA, with properly rated jacket.

    Perhaps for some, I see no difference....CAT-6 is just as easy as CAT-5e for me.

    He's in the "united states" according to his profile, which is not true here. It may be "A" in Estonia, but "B" is suggested and more predominate here in the U.S.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
  10. Mikk36

    Mikk36 n3wb

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    Indeed, I mixed up shielding and Cat6.
     
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  11. Mikk36

    Mikk36 n3wb

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    A or B seems to be US vs Europe thing (ie, which is recommended).
     
  12. eeeeesh

    eeeeesh Getting the hang of it

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    It's funny that you posted that link - I just picked up a box from Amazon Warehouse for $85 versus the $250 list price. Glad to hear it is 'good stuff'

    Just for info, here is another 1,000 feet of shielded - normal price is $349. Amazon Warehouse price is $120 (package damage)
    Amazon.com: Buying Choices: Cat6 Plenum Shielded (CMP), 1000ft, Gray, 23AWG Solid Bare Copper, 550MHz, ETL Listed, Overall Foil Shield (FTP), Bulk Ethernet Cable, trueCABLE
    GR8II-194.jpg
     
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  13. TekAssistant

    TekAssistant n3wb

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    Thanks for sharing the better price! Much appreciated.