bidens incredible transition to electric cars

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I posted this on another thread, but thought it needs a post of it's own.


Nothing like letting the cat out of the bag why they are shutting down pipelines and stuff to run fuel prices sky high. Electric cars.

the brunt of a sagging economy, the Biden administration appears to be framing this as a good thing, believing that citizens will be better off in the future if current supply shortages and high gas prices spiral out of control.

The United States, according to President Joe Biden, is in the midst of an “incredible transition”—one that will pave the way for a green economy.

While the administration may tout the benefits of a sustainable future, the question remains as to what will happen to average Americans while this “transition” takes place.

More importantly, what’s the endgame of all this that Americans don’t know about?

Biden, during a May 23 joint press conference in Japan with the country’s Prime Minister Kishida Fumio, used the word “transition” to seemingly admit that soaring gasoline prices are just part of his administration’s overall plan for moving from hydrocarbons to renewables.

“When it comes to the gas prices, we’re going through an incredible transition that is taking place that, God willing, when it’s over, we’ll be stronger and the world will be stronger and less reliant on fossil fuels when this is over,” Biden said.

The comment seems to suggest that ensuring the country’s gas supply is not high on Biden’s agenda, though the administration did announce to release of 1 million barrels of crude oil a day for six months between May and August.

Biden’s remarks angered some Republican lawmakers, including Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) said the president is “painfully out-of-touch.”

“The pain at the pump every #NY21 family feels is a direct result of Joe Biden and House Democrats’ Far-Left agenda,” Stefanik wrote on Twitter.

Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) also took exception, writing on Twitter, “the only ‘incredible transition’ we want from Joe Biden is his transition to retirement.”

“Every family in America is paying record-breaking high gas prices thanks to @JoeBiden’s war on American energy—but the president doesn’t care,” Scott added.
Epoch Times Photo Director of the National Economic Council Brian Deese speaks during a briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, on March 31, 2022. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)
A day before the press conference, Biden’s top economic advisor, Brian Deese told Fox News Sunday that the U.S. economy “is in a period of transition,” when he refused to directly answer a question on whether the economy is entering a recession.

“We’re moving from the strongest economic recovery in modern history to what can be a period of more stable and resilient growth,” Deese said.

On May 1, Samantha Power, head of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), told ABC that fertilizer shortages—caused by Russia exporting less fertilizer presented farmers a chance to “hasten transition” from fertilizer to “natural solutions,” such as manure and compost, a change that farmers would need to “make eventually anyway.”

“So never let a crisis go to waste,” Power said.

Looking at the whole picture, it seems more and more the case that the Biden administration officials are just letting these different economic problems happen on purpose, believing that as these crucial resources collapse Americans will be led to a world of green alternatives.

But such a “transition” is no laughing matter, since these economic problems look set to produce real world pain. The gas crisis and fertilizer shortage are contributing to a global food crisis, and these and other factors could soon lead to actual mass death.

The current wheat supply crunch is in a case in point. On May 19, Sara Menker, the chief executive officer of New York-based agriculture analytics firm Gro Intelligence, told the U.N. Security Council that the world had only about 10 weeks of wheat supply left in storage.

“I want to start by explicitly saying that the Russia–Ukraine war did not start the food security crisis. It simply added fuel to a fire that was long burning,” Menker said. “It is important to note that the lowest grain inventory levels the world has ever seen are now occurring while access to fertilizers is highly constrained.”

Meanwhile, diesel prices in the United States have jumped more than 70 percent from a year ago. Further price increases could dampen the economy since diesel is used in everything from cargo ships, to freight trucks, to farming machinery.
Epoch Times Photo U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris speaks on the administration’s American Rescue Plan and Bipartisan Infrastructure Law investments from the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, in Washington, on March 7, 2022. (Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)
The Biden administration has spoken enthusiastically about a future with clean energy, such as when Vice President Kamala Harris in March spoke of a world without hydrocarbon emissions.

“Imagine a future: The freight trucks that deliver bread and milk to our grocery store shelves and the buses that take children to school and parents to work; imagine all the heavy-duty vehicles that keep our supply lines strong and allow our economy to grow—imagine that they produced zero emissions,” Harris said during an “Accelerating Clean Transportation” event.

Speaking at the same event, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg claimed that electric vehicles will bring “cost savings” to Americans.

“Clean transportation can bring significant cost savings for the American people as well,” Buttigieg said. “Last month, we announced a $5 billion investment to build out a nationwide electric vehicle charging network so the people from rural to suburban to urban communities can all benefit from the gas savings of driving an EV.”

Taken together, whether it’s with food or with gas, it seems as though many people within the Biden administration are pretty clear about what they’re trying to do.

They don’t appear to be willing or interested in fixing things, when it comes to the things that Americans all worried about.

Rather, it seems as though they’re planning for this—a transition to a green future, to the system that they want.

The Epoch Times has reached out to the White House for comment.



Joshua Philipp
 

bigredfish

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Exactly what they campaigned for at the last election and the people voted for it.
Only the shallow, self centered that get their news from CNN, have no critical thinking skills, and farm out their parenting responsibilities to the pedophiles who pose as teachers. Yes, they did.
 

redpoint5

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I've been enthusiastic towards EVs for a long time. That said...

Imagine a Honda Accord has a $7,500 federal tax credit, but the Toyota Camry has nothing. How many Accords vs Camrys do you think would be sold? It would be like 99% Accords.

EVs are 3% of vehicle sales despite a $7,500 federal tax credit, not to mention state incentives that can bring the price down ten grand. The fact that insanely high subsidy results in 3% of sales is damning evidence that EVs need to get a lot better. It's not just lack of fast chargers; it's the massive suck that is the battery. The reality is they need to get about $10k "better". That could mean more affordable, that could mean batteries that suck a lot less, that could mean massive savings per mile using electricity vs gasoline... various combinations of everything that adds value.

EVs are great for local driving if you've got garage space for one. They're terrible at replacing vehicles that go on longer trips, or that can't live in a garage or charge at work.
 
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The tax credit starts out at 7,500 and is reduced as the sales reach 200,000 vehicles. Because of this, car manufacturers such as GM open a plant, hire workers and produce the Chevy Volt.

When the number of Chevy Volts exceed 200,000, the plant is closed and the workers laid off. Why? Because then GM comes up with a new EV and opens another plant, hires workers...I think you get the pattern. They want the the tax credit for buyers.
 

fenderman

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I've been enthusiastic towards EVs for a long time. That said...

Imagine a Honda Accord has a $7,500 federal tax credit, but the Toyota Camry has nothing. How many Accords vs Camrys do you think would be sold? It would be like 99% Accords.

EVs are 3% of vehicle sales despite a $7,500 federal tax credit, not to mention state incentives that can bring the price down ten grand. The fact that insanely high subsidy results in 3% of sales is damning evidence that EVs need to get a lot better. It's not just lack of fast chargers; it's the massive suck that is the battery. The reality is they need to get about $10k "better". That could mean more affordable, that could mean batteries that suck a lot less, that could mean massive savings per mile using electricity vs gasoline... various combinations of everything that adds value.

EVs are great for local driving if you've got garage space for one. They're terrible at replacing vehicles that go on longer trips, or that can't live in a garage or charge at work.
I like EV's for the gobs of torque. As others point out the grid cant handle too many of them and once the demand for electricity goes up the cost will as well. Owners will not save any money unless gas prices get much higher or electric power prices drop.
Personally, if they are going to force a transition, I like the idea of a plug in hybird. Many of these achieve 30+ miles on electric alone. This would allow the typical commuter to drive on electric power alone round trip to work. These numbers will only get better with time. I also suspect that many of the folks buying new cars are over extending themselves and would not benefit from the 7500 credit as their tax liability is less than the credit and its non refundable and doesnt carry to the next year.
 

redpoint5

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I agree. What's held me back is not wanting one of those batteries in our attached garage.
Yeah, there's been a few fires. I'm not one to stress about unlikely events, but I'd still at least practice how I'd tug a flaming vehicle out of the garage, and install a smoke detector in there.

In my estimation, an unlikely but catastrophic failure of a single cell in a battery should not result in the whole thing going up in flames. Bad design. As I said, batteries suck. They are essentially expensive gas tanks, slow to refuel, heavy, bulky, and potentially catastrophically failing. They need to get a lot better.

I like EV's for the gobs of torque. As others point out the grid cant handle too many of them and once the demand for electricity goes up the cost will as well. Owners will not save any money unless gas prices get much higher or electric power prices drop.
Personally, if they are going to force a transition, I like the idea of a plug in hybird. Many of these achieve 30+ miles on electric alone. This would allow the typical commuter to drive on electric power alone round trip to work. These numbers will only get better with time.
EVs are better in every aspect except for the stinkin battery. Cost per mile on electricity is about 1/3rd on average. My cost to drive my 30 MPG Acura has been 11 cents per mile. The Prius plug-in was 6 cents per mile on gasoline, but 3 cents per mile on electricity.

The electric grid can be made more efficient if EVs are mostly charged at night. Bringing baseload usage up narrows the difference between peak and off-peak. It's not the amount of electricity demanded from the grid that makes it cost more, but the difference between low demand and high demand. That needs to be balanced as much as possible.

I've been saying plug-in hybrids are extremely undervalued. You minimize the thing that sucks the most; the battery, while maximizing the utility of it. No range anxiety, plenty of performance, and cheap commutes.
 
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fenderman

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The tax credit starts out at 7,500 and is reduced as the sales reach 200,000 vehicles. Because of this, car manufacturers such as GM open a plant, hire workers and produce the Chevy Volt.

When the number of Chevy Volts exceed 200,000, the plant is closed and the workers laid off. Why? Because then GM comes up with a new EV and opens another plant, hires workers...I think you get the pattern. They want the the tax credit for buyers.
As I understand it, the credit is eliminated after a total of 200k vehicles from the same manufacturer so building a new EV would not help.
 

redpoint5

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As I understand it, the credit is eliminated after a total of 200k vehicles from the same manufacturer so building a new EV would not help.
It gets phased out over several quarters. The interesting thing is you can sell unlimited amounts during those 2 quarters after triggering the 200k threshold. If I were Tesla, I'd have warehoused a bunch of cars so that when the 200k limit hit, I could sell a ton during the phase out period.

Launching new models doesn't give more credits.

Besides the stupidity of subsidizing a particular type of expensive car for wealthy people (regressive policy), most auto manufacturers are foreign. Manufacturers don't just "give" the tax credit to consumers, they raise the price of the vehicle knowing people will get a tax break. That means most of the subsidy goes to the manufacture. That also means the US is subsidizing profits for foreign auto manufactures. It's the dumbest idea a person could have for "going green". Nobody that has had an econ101 class would think this is a great idea.
 

fenderman

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Besides the stupidity of subsidizing a particular type of expensive car for wealthy people (regressive policy), most auto manufacturers are foreign. Manufacturers don't just "give" the tax credit to consumers, they raise the price of the vehicle knowing people will get a tax break. That means most of the subsidy goes to the manufacture. That also means the US is subsidizing profits for foreign auto manufactures. It's the dumbest idea a person could have for "going green". Nobody that has had an econ101 class would think this is a great idea.
Its not dumb if its intentional....donations...lobbyists....
 

redpoint5

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That’s why they design a NEW EV or Hybrid. They call it something different and the tax credit starts all over.
That's not right. The credit is per manufacturer, not model.

It's actually dumb as a manufacturer to build an EV, because only the first 16 kWh of battery gets the subsidy. The 300 HP, AWD, 40 MPG, 40 mile EV range Rav4 Prime qualifies for the full $7,500 tax credit because it has the minimum size battery to fully qualify. Super smart. Toyota should have started with that.

That subsidy works out to $479 per kWh, but it might only cost Toyota $125 per kWh to manufacture. Money in the bank. A 60 kWh EV doesn't get any more subsidy than the Rav4 Prime, yet has a super expensive battery.
 

IAmATeaf

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The switch to EVs from a government point of view is in the main pretty narrow minded in that they full well know that if the uptake to switch were higher then they electricity boards wouldn’t be able to cope and here in the UK the onus is in private companies to build charging infrastructure. In both cases from what I’ve seen they have no real plans.

I was in India back in March/April and even over there there is a big push for EVs with big subsidies but where I live for example my supply even though the fuse box is rated at 60a is supplied by what looks like a 15a max wire! So the country is not really ready but it looks good to to be actively promoting EVs!
 
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