Can a old router be used as a repeater/range extender

Safari

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I want to extend the range of my LAN setup to the end of our (almost) block long warehouse. I don't think my GB wavlink router will reach that far. I read that some wifi cameras
can function as repeaters, but I dont think my 6 Dlink cameras (I bought 6 used DCS-932 wifi cameras for $5 a piece) will function as repeaters, maybe I'm wrong. But I have access to many old used $5 routers.

What's the cheapest way to extend the wifi range of my LAN network?
 

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Whether a router can be used as a repeater, extender or access point depends on the router. What is the router make and model? Check the user manual is the best way to find out.

No, WiFi cameras normally don't have the ability to act as a repeater.
 

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Whether a router can be used as a repeater, extender or access point depends on the router. What is the router make and model? Check the user manual is the best way to find out.

No, WiFi cameras normally don't have the ability to act as a repeater.
So I'm looking for a router that can also function as an access point?. I'll have to research the router before I buy it. I see many Linksys routers at a second hand store I frequent. They are loaded with cheap ethernet equipment
 
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Relying on WiFi to act as a repeater for video cameras is a plan doomed for failure. WiFi is not designed for the constant high traffic a video camera generates. Generally more than two will constantly disconnect and Murphy says that will happen at the worst possible time.

Either invest in fiber or use a dedicated RF link like a Ubiquity Nano Loco.
 

SouthernYankee

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I have used an ASUS router as a wired access point (not for cameras) I use the same SSID on different channels (1,6,11) between the access point and the the main router.
DO NOT RUN SECURITY CAMERAS ON WIFI.
 

TonyR

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So I'm looking for a router that can also function as an access point?
Good advice from @sebastiantombs and @SouthernYankee but to answer one of your questions:

Most brand name and popular routers such as Asus and Netgear (and more) can be configured as an AP (Access Point) as follows:
  • Log into the router's webGUI
  • Disable DHCP
  • Assign a static IP to the router's LAN
Assuming you have another router somewhere in your network assigning IP's to your network devices, assign a static IP for the above AP in the same subnet as your router and one that is outside of your router's DHCP pool.

You would run an Ethernet cable from one of the AP's LAN ports to one of your router's LAN ports.
 

nostrawag

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I want to extend the range of my LAN setup to the end of our (almost) block long warehouse. I don't think my GB wavlink router will reach that far. I read that some wifi cameras
can function as repeaters, but I dont think my 6 Dlink cameras (I bought 6 used DCS-932 wifi cameras for $5 a piece) will function as repeaters, maybe I'm wrong. But I have access to many old used $5 routers.

What's the cheapest way to extend the wifi range of my LAN network?
personally i would run a cat 5e cable between available remote ends of routers/access points and extend this way as a 'backbone'. you can then connect wifi access points on each end to extend wireless capabilities.
the other way perhaps is using DLAN points, using your electricity cabling?
 

Safari

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Good advice from @sebastiantombs and @SouthernYankee but to answer one of your questions:

Most brand name and popular routers such as Asus and Netgear (and more) can be configured as an AP (Access Point) as follows:
  • Log into the router's webGUI
  • Disable DHCP
  • Assign a static IP to the router's LAN
Assuming you have another router somewhere in your network assigning IP's to your network devices, assign a static IP for the above AP in the same subnet as your router and one that is outside of your router's DHCP pool.

You would run an Ethernet cable from one of the AP's LAN ports to one of your router's LAN ports.
Running a ethernet cable between them is not practical. It has to be done wirelessly
 

holiday

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how about Powerline networking ?

Use your existing electrical wiring to extend your Internet access to any room in your house.
 

Safari

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I have used an ASUS router as a wired access point (not for cameras) I use the same SSID on different channels (1,6,11) between the access point and the the main router.
DO NOT RUN SECURITY CAMERAS ON WIFI.
The cameras will be offline LAN only. I'm going to try 4 cameras with ethernet cables and 4 over wifi. The wifi cameras only have a resolution of 240p to 480p. Will see what happens
 

Safari

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Relying on WiFi to act as a repeater for video cameras is a plan doomed for failure. WiFi is not designed for the constant high traffic a video camera generates. Generally more than two will constantly disconnect and Murphy says that will happen at the worst possible time.

Either invest in fiber or use a dedicated RF link like a Ubiquity Nano Loco.
The Ubiquity Nano Loco looks nice, thanks
 

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SouthernYankee

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I have posted this before.
I did a wifi test a while back with multiple 2MP cameras each camera was set to VBR, 15 FPS, 15 Iframe, 3072kbs, h.264. Using a wifi analyzer I selected the least busy channel (1,6,11) on the 2.4 GHZ band and set up a separate SSID and access point. With 3 cameras in direct line of sight of the AP about 25 feet away I was able to maintain a reasonable stable network with only intermittent signal drops from the cameras. Added a 4th camera and the network became totally unstable. Also add a lot of motion to the 3 cameras caused some more network instability. More data more instability.
The cameras are nearly continuously transmitting. So any lost packet causes a retry, which cause more traffic, which causes more lost packets.
Wifi does not have a flow control, or a token to transmit. So you devices transmit any time they want, more devices more collisions.
As a side note, it is very easy to jam a wifi network. Wifi is find for watching the bird feed but not for home surveillance and security.

The problem is like standing in a room, with multiple people talking to you at the same time about different subjects. You need to answer each person or they repeat the question.

Test do not guess.

For a 802.11G 2.4 GHZ wifi network the Theoretical Speed is 54Mbps (6.7MBs) real word speed is nearer to 10-29Mbps (1.25-3.6 MBs) for a single channel
 

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I have posted this before.
I did a wifi test a while back with multiple 2MP cameras each camera was set to VBR, 15 FPS, 15 Iframe, 3072kbs, h.264. Using a wifi analyzer I selected the least busy channel (1,6,11) on the 2.4 GHZ band and set up a separate SSID and access point. With 3 cameras in direct line of sight of the AP about 25 feet away I was able to maintain a reasonable stable network with only intermittent signal drops from the cameras. Added a 4th camera and the network became totally unstable. Also add a lot of motion to the 3 cameras caused some more network instability. More data more instability.
The cameras are nearly continuously transmitting. So any lost packet causes a retry, which cause more traffic, which causes more lost packets.
Wifi does not have a flow control, or a token to transmit. So you devices transmit any time they want, more devices more collisions.
As a side note, it is very easy to jam a wifi network. Wifi is find for watching the bird feed but not for home surveillance and security.

The problem is like standing in a room, with multiple people talking to you at the same time about different subjects. You need to answer each person or they repeat the question.

Test do not guess.

For a 802.11G 2.4 GHZ wifi network the Theoretical Speed is 54Mbps (6.7MBs) real word speed is nearer to 10-29Mbps (1.25-3.6 MBs) for a single channel
I'll take your advice and keep the wifi to only one camera, and do five over ethernet. I bought a switch as others here suggested
 

TheSwede

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Dont ! As said before.
The DCS-932 uses 2,4 ghz and they will stream continous.
It is only 3 practically usable channels on 2,4.... and 2.4 will travel long- more disturbance from neighbours
If you have more cameras on the same router/accesspoint (as you do) the channel will be crowded.

If you use a repeater it will half the bandwith since it listens and then send the same packet.

It is possible to use ex ASUS routers as mesh, then the link on 5 Ghz, it is better but not perfect.

I have a single DCS-2230 as a a single client on a AP that is about 1 meter away and it is not completely reliable, reconnects sometime.
It IS working but not as a security cam, more to se how much snow or grass it is.

Use the cameras for watching such things as wheater, mice or easy or to do a quick setup.
Or put a cable in it..

TheSwede
 

TheSwede

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Much better way to go..

Instead of installing 220/110V to the places for the cameras, maybe needing a electrician.


Buy a POE switch, buy some POE to 5v adapters.
Draw CAT5 cables yourself and connect the cameras to the cables via the adapter.
1617879651962.png

And then you have the infrastructure ready for better cameras now when you are bitten by the Camerabug ;-)
 
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Safari

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Dont ! As said before.
The DCS-932 uses 2,4 ghz and they will stream continous.
It is only 3 practically usable channels on 2,4.... and 2.4 will travel long- more disturbance from neighbours
If you have more cameras on the same router/accesspoint (as you do) the channel will be crowded.

If you use a repeater it will half the bandwith since it listens and then send the same packet.

It is possible to use ex ASUS routers as mesh, then the link on 5 Ghz, it is better but not perfect.

I have a single DCS-2230 as a a single client on a AP that is about 1 meter away and it is not completely reliable, reconnects sometime.
It IS working but not as a security cam, more to se how much snow or grass it is.

Use the cameras for watching such things as wheater, mice or easy or to do a quick setup.
Or put a cable in it..

TheSwede
I have one DCS- 2132, four DCS-932 and one DCS-934. I dont actually need any of them to view 100% of my designated area, my three poe Amcrest's will do that job. I got the Dlinks at a second hand store for $5 a piece so I figured I'll try to put them to use.

The DCS- 2132 will be the only camera on wifi from a distance of about 50 meters of unrestricted space. If it fails to connect I'll take it down.

Also, I'm assuming changing the channel is simply done in the router. How do I determine the channel with the least amount of traffic ?, or are throse channels 1, 6 or 11 as SouthernYankee stated?
 
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