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RichardPryor

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Those wires under the stairs are speaker wires
 

tangent

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Those wires under the stairs are speaker wires
That makes a bit more sense, but that's a lot of speaker wire to run to a location where it's a bit hard to work with. An AV rack in the top of the pantry or master or basement closet would almost make more sense.

You don't really need to stay away from duct work. If cable is inside a plenum, it should be plenum rated. Some distance from the blower doesn't hurt, but 3-4' is likely plenty and the blower probably isn't that electrically noisy.

Generally you want to try to keep your low voltage wiring 12"+ from your AC wiring when you can (min 1" where wires cross in the wall).
 

tangent

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When you run Cat-6, speaker wires, and alarm wires be careful not to staple the wires too aggressively. Insulated staples that are a little too big are a good idea.

I was thinking something like this for your wiring plan

rp-fp.png

Pre wiring for motorized blinds may be more trouble that it's worth.
 

tangent

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Have you thought about if you may want a big PTZ? Something like this: SD59225U-HNI
You could always pre-wire and just put up a junction box and cover.
 

tangent

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This is a bit of a distraction from what you're currently doing, but I typed it earlier and for some reason didn't end up posting it.
Ubiquiti sells some 300' single-mode fiber, but it sounds like you'll need to go further than that.
It's $120 for a bundle that includes 6 fibers.
That's a good price. I wish they gave specs that were a little clearer regarding the thickness of the buffer. I haven't worked with fiber much. Pre-terminated cables are a good option to simplify installation which would otherwise require some expensive tools. The Ubiquiti FiberCable doesn't include a 'puling eye' so you'd need to make or buy one. I think some of the other options have more robust breakout out cables. Single mode fiber may be bit more temperamental/fragile than multi-mode. If you order a pre-terminated fiber assembly, you 'll want to make it a bit longer than you need, you don't want to some up short. They do sell some products to coil up excess. If you were to buy fiber that isn't pre-terminated, you'd probably want to pay someone to terminate it.

The adapters for single mode fiber have certainly come down in price, but single mode is more expensive and requires more precision for everything to work. If you choose multimode cable, OM3 would be the best choice but OM2 would also be fine.

There are different variants of outdoor rated fiber. Indoor/outdoor is generally the cheapest. Outdoor is generally going to be filled with gel and more of a pain to work with. Gel filled cable can only be brought indoors 50', it sounds like the gel may be flammable. Some outdoor cable uses a dry gel or other means of stopping water. Direct burial fiber is generally armored meaning it has some kind of metal sheath in the cable. For the OP's needs and in conduit, I think non-armored cable (indoor/outdoor or outdoor) is the probably the best choice (no metal).

If you use switch hardware that takes regular SFP devices not SFP+ the adapters are pretty inexpensive.
Like these: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N4KWOI1/ https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MY5498F

The other retailers you linked to also have pretty good prices. Here's a little look at pricing from from them on a variety of cable for 100' of indoor/outdoor cable, LC/UPC:
FS.com: 2mm breakout tubes, 100', Pulling eye one end, $30 more for both ends,
6- Strand OM 2: $186 shipped, 4 Strand OM2: $164 shipped, 6-strand OS2 (single mode) $160 shipped,

Fibertronics based in Florida, 2mm breakout, 100', Pull eye one end, $20 more for both ends,
OM3 6- strand, $216 shipped, OS1/OS2 (idk) single mode 6 strand $182 shipped, 4 strand $166 shipped

DiscountLowVoltage is more but shipping is free over $200. They have a fair amount of educational content in the form of videos and blog articles.

Some more local options
Fiber Optic Cables in Oregon (OR) on ThomasNet.com
Wire & Cable-low voltage

Make sure to call 811 or your local utility locating service before you do an trenching along the driveway.
 

Whoaru99

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FWIW, I'm gearing up to put fiber between detached building/garage and house. If you don't mind used, I've bought both 1000Base-T and 1000Base-SX SFPs off eBay for $4 each or less, delivered. I'll be using armored direct burial LC-MM OM3. Originally had planned to use copper from the uplink port of the switch in the house to the computer, but found an Intel dual-port 1000Base-SX NIC for cheap too so I'll be all fiber "backbone" on my camera network.

Apology for the extra info, the main point was mentioning used SFPs from eBay. Easy to find and inexpensive. That said, in the scope of the OPs project, a few new SFPs for $30 each or whatever is nearly invisible amongst all other things.
 

RichardPryor

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Stupid question, that coax cable, what is it for? TV? Around here, DirecTV installs a main box somewhere in the house and the rest work wireless. Do I still need to run coax cable if that’s the case?
 

RichardPryor

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That makes a bit more sense, but that's a lot of speaker wire to run to a location where it's a bit hard to work with. An AV rack in the top of the pantry or master or basement closet would almost make more sense.
Not sure I’m following. I need the AVR to be next to the TV so that I can use the remote to turn volume up and down, etc.
 

RichardPryor

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Have you thought about if you may want a big PTZ? Something like this: SD59225U-HNI
You could always pre-wire and just put up a junction box and cover.
I haven’t given the camera selection much thought to be honest. Most cameras will be mounted on a wall, so I figured a bullet style camera would be more appropriate? Can those domes be mounted on walls or just ceilings?
 

Whoaru99

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Not sure I’m following. I need the AVR to be next to the TV so that I can use the remote to turn volume up and down, etc.
It doesn't need to be unless that's where you really want it.

Stuff made within the last 8-9 years should be at least HDMI version 1.4, wherein Audio Return Channel (ARC) was implemented. With ARC (in both the TV and receiver) there need be only one cable joining the two units. That one cable will covey the picture from devices connected to the AVR to the TV and that same cable can convey the audio from the TV back to the receiver, say if you were watching Netflix on a smart TV app.

Additionally, there are infra red (IR) and or radio frequency (RF) repeating systems that will grab the signal from your remote control and distribute it to some other location, wherein it's "rebroadcast" to the gear typically by means of an IR blaster.

I use both those things in my mancave/main HT system to preclude having all the gear up by the TV. I want no distractions from blinky lights and displays while watching a movie, other than the TV itself. The TV (and of course the front and center speakers) are at the North end of the room, all the other gear is at the South end of the room, behind the main viewing/listening area where you don't see it. The distance is about 22ft as the crow flies, perhaps another 10ft for the cabling. One (active/RedMere) HDMI cable joins the pre/pro to the TV, then there is the IR receiver up by the TV (it's small, don't notice it there). A thin cable joins the IR receiver to the little black box of the repeater system then the IR blaster is mounted to the edge of the equipment rack. To operate I point the remote at the TV area like one customarily does but all the action happens behind the scene, so to speak, through the IR repeater system to control the gear.

If one went to a RF system like the Harmony Hub setup, you don't need the IR receiver and repeater. The Hub acts as the repeater and IR blaster (also can do Bluetooth) and the remote connects to the hub by RF - doesn't have to be pointed in any specific direction (although from habit I find myself still pointing it at the TV, LOL). It also has smart phone app for either Android or IOS and a very good database of products where all the universal remote programming is already done for you. You just pick the gear from a list and tell it what you want to turn on/off with what. I have this system, two of them actually, in a 2nd house and it works pretty well. Actually is a pretty slick setup.
 
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RichardPryor

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Ah, makes sense. I’m not sure about max distance between user and avr if using IR, but I don’t have anything near where I could put the avr, except third floor attic room.

I had something like this in mind. I could hide, or display it (with a glass door).

 

Whoaru99

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Marantz, sweet!

I'm using an older but still very nice Marantz AV7005 pre/pro in my main mancave system.
 

tangent

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Stupid question, that coax cable, what is it for? TV? Around here, DirecTV installs a main box somewhere in the house and the rest work wireless. Do I still need to run coax cable if that’s the case?
Yes coax would be used for video distribution. It can be used for other purposes. As we move to higher bandwidth sources, a wireless solution may not always do the job.
Not sure I’m following. I need the AVR to be next to the TV so that I can use the remote to turn volume up and down, etc.
Multi room audio can be more complicated. Depending on the equipment you're going to use sometimes running it all to one place isn't even the best option. I would have chosen an interior wall not an exterior wall as the location those wires end.
Yes it does. Why do you ask, for the alarm system? Garage man door is also outswing.
In my neck of the woods out swinging exterior doors are very uncommon in residential settings, I'm not sure it would even pass inspection. From a security standpoint it isn't great to have your hinges exposed.
 
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xmfan

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:welcome:

compared to other options Synology is a poor choice for recording your cameras.
@tangent - can you please elaborate why in your opinion Synology is a poor choice for recording the cameras?
I was planning on buying a refurb i5 or i7 desktop to run Blue Iris then routing the video streams from the 10 cameras to my synology NAS 5 bay unit. I have no intentions of using synology's surveillance station option and pay $50+ per camera license

would this not be advisable ?
 

tangent

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@tangent - can you please elaborate why in your opinion Synology is a poor choice for recording the cameras?
I was planning on buying a refurb i5 or i7 desktop to run Blue Iris then routing the video streams from the 10 cameras to my synology NAS 5 bay unit. I have no intentions of using synology's surveillance station option and pay $50+ per camera license

would this not be advisable ?
Search the forum for synology. Surveillance Station is overpriced and less effective than other options. Not sure we've had many people just use it as storage. My thought would be, why not just put another sata drive in the blue iris machine you're planning on using? If a NAS is part of the equation, I'd make sure video footage is written to a physical disc and not a RAID or logical volume. You don't want a drive that eventually fails from cctv being written to it to take other data with it.
 

RichardPryor

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Multi room audio can be more complicated. Depending on the equipment you're going to use sometimes running it all to one place isn't even the best option. I would have chosen an interior wall not an exterior wall as the location those wires end.
Hmm. Because of insulation? You’re probably right. Poor choice on my part. I was going to do 2 inches of closed spray in walls. I’ll make sure that bay gets 4 inches.

Equipment will be limited to an AVR, one 12 channel amp and an Nvidia Shield.

I’m willing to rewire speakers. At this point money is not a concern. I just don’t see anything close by where I could terminate speakers.

You good with the 4” of foam and calling it good @tangent?

In my neck of the woods out swinging exterior doors are very uncommon in residential settings, I'm not sure it would even pass inspection. From a security standpoint it isn't great to have your hinges exposed.
I hear you.
 

RichardPryor

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Where would you put access points? I was thinking pantry (2nd floor) and wet bar (in bonus room first floor). I have a couple ubiquity unifi lite AP’s. Wet bar will be in corner of bonus room adjacent to garage. This is pantry’s new location. Already have a cat 6 run to each.

 
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