Installing Dahua turret camera on garage wall - junction box, wall mount, direct? Ideas please.

camviewer43

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Hi,
I want to install a turret camera (Dahua IPC-T5442TM-AS) on front wall of my garage. Before looking at the manual, I had imagine it would be installed like this image, flat against the wall of the garage siding. I'm stealing this image from a websearch, but I imagine something like this:

1585601192511.png

But when I look through the manual at mounting hardware, the suggested "wall mount" makes the camera stick out instead of flat against a wall.

1585601249052.png

I'm pretty new to this. The mounting method I thought looked the best is actually the "ceiling mount", where the camera is flush against the surface and sticks out the least from the wall. Can the Dahua turret camera can be mounted as a ceiling mount, but just on a wall instead? Are there issues with water ingress when mounted this way? Does the camera need to be "upside down" as shown to be totally water proof if I don't have an eve to put it under? Is there enough adjustment to face the camera down the driveway if it's mounted on a vertical surface?

Note: I have full access to the inside wall of the garage, so I'll be running the wire through the wall from the inside to a hole to the outside, if that makes sense.

This is the garage wall where I was thinking of mounting it. My house is on the right side of the picture here, so the camera would catch the back entrance as well as down the driveway approach. It's a longish driveway. I'm a little worried that my left side neighbor's bushes might catch a lot of the IR light and be really bright, so we'll see. I'm tempted to mount the camera lower so the sun isn't shining right into the camera for later parts of the afternoon, where the bushes create some shade.

Besides the water ingress issue, I'm also not sure if the turret is flexible enough to be rotated so I can actually see down the driveway if the mounting surface is orientated against the wall.


1585602451152.png

Edit: While searching more on the forum, I found this wall mounted turret, just like how I want to do it. But they seem to use a junction box. I don't understand why they used a junction box here instead of mounting the camera straight into the wall? I thought a junction box is used if you're running wire on the outside of the wall (instead of straight through from the inside) and need some room to turn the connector?

1585604142590.png
 
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i would use the ceiling bracket it will work just fine for a turret. Just remember you always want two cameras in on area. One for overview and one for zoomed in view to get a good picture of faces. Which means get a varifocal camera and a non varifocal camera. Take your time building your system. Study the wiki notes over and over and over, read as many forums as you can. Make sure your cameras are starlight for best night time captures. Do you have any lights out there i don't see any in this pic? The more light at night its the best. Good luck.
 
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Some use the junction box to hide the wires if they do not have a place inside the wall to do so. I have mine on junction boxes and they are under an eve. But its so that i can hide my wires.
 

eggsan

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I normally use the ceiling mount, which normally provides enough space to include the cables/connector inside (network connector for ip cams or balun for HD-Coax)
 

cordes

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If the wall in the garage on the back side isn't finished, I would think you could go right into the wall and have plenty of options for what to do with the cables in there? Are you guys suggesting the wall mount or the junction box just to keep the hole in the wall smaller?
 
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I have a Dahua turret mounted on a tree. I did use a junction box to protect the RJ connector, but would have no problem mounting it directly on a wall. In terms of water ingress, use a calk around the base of the camera, but be sure to leave an empty spot at the bottom to allow any water that does get in to have a way to get out again. You could also calk the wire entry hole, and remember if mounted directly to the wall that will be a 3/4" hole to clear the connector. I use Duct Seal for sealing/weatherproofing cameras rather than traditional calk.

In terms of rotation you will have no problems. They rotate 360 degrees around the base and the "ball", that's the actual camera, rotates/tilts about 180 degrees.

Two cameras, especially for a driveway, is the only way to go.
 

camviewer43

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Thanks everyone. I didn't understand that the junction box reduces the size of the hole you need to drill! Much appreciate the explainer.

Did I miss something in the list of official threads on installation that explains stuff like what I'm asking?
 

cordes

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Thanks everyone. I didn't understand that the junction box reduces the size of the hole you need to drill! Much appreciate the explainer.

Did I miss something in the list of official threads on installation that explains stuff like what I'm asking?
I think there's a lot of stuff that's easy to miss with all of this. I've done none of it, but I've been thinking hard about my installation. I just came upon the fact that with the box or mount you can keep the fatter connectors outside of the dwelling.
 
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That is true. Behind each camera is a pigtail that requires you to drill a hole into your premises 7/16" in diameter. To avoid drilling such a massive hole and inviting problems like water to enter the premises, the junction box will help greatly. All you're passing only one Ethernet wire through the premise, then you only need to drill a 3/8" hole, much smaller, and easier to patch if you change your mind down the line. :)

I think there's a lot of stuff that's easy to miss with all of this. I've done none of it, but I've been thinking hard about my installation. I just came upon the fact that with the box or mount you can keep the fatter connectors outside of the dwelling.
 
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What I recommend is to make sure you have all the accessories and hardware on hand before proceeding to installing. Its annoying when I need to jump in the car and run to Home Depot just to pick up another roll of self-infusing tape and a couple of extra compression connects :p :lol:

Thanks everyone. I didn't understand that the junction box reduces the size of the hole you need to drill! Much appreciate the explainer.

Did I miss something in the list of official threads on installation that explains stuff like what I'm asking?
 

camviewer43

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Its annoying when I need to jump in the car and run to Home Depot just to pick up another roll of self-infusing tape and a couple of extra compression connects
Yet more items I didn't know I might need. Thanks, I'll do more reading.
 
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Yet more items I didn't know I might need. Thanks, I'll do more reading.
 

Ckb3

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My suggestion would be to mount camera without a junction box since you have direct access to inside the garage. Run the connector through the wall and use a Junction box inside the garage with a conduit stub up into the attic.
 
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Use the junction box, its not always a pleasure when you have to fill in a bigger hole. It demands more.
 
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