Preparing ASUS RT-AC88U for Dahua NVR5216-16P-4KS2E initialization

Midway

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I have around 15 wired Clients comprised of TV’s, Blu-ray players, AVR’s, etc. and a number of iTach devices used for controlling these devices with an iPhone remote control app.

In addition, I have a number of Netgear un-managed switches around the house, most in the AV racks to connect AV devices and the iTachs.

My wife and I have an assortment of iPhones, iPads, computers and electronic equipment connected via WiFi.

They all have DHCP Client IP addresses. I have wanted to change to static since power failures and other network disruptions screw up the app and render a number of the devices uncontrollable from the remote app unless I reprogram it and I’ve stopped dealing with it and just use the factory remotes usually. Dealing with that isn’t a priority though I may revisit it after getting the NVR set up.

With the ASUS DHCP server on my router handling all IP addresses for my home network, it currently has an IP Pool Starting address of 192.168.1.2 and an IP ending address of 192.168.1.254.

Should this range be modified in order to set aside a range of IP addresses available for orderly static IP assignment?

In browsing the Wiki, cliff notes and primers, one method for NVR initialization is to grab an IP address when setting up the NVR in DHCP mode and then de-selecting DHCP mode on the NVR.

Is this the recommended way to proceed?

I have 10 cameras available to install but want to get 4 or so installed to start.

Do I need to assign static IP addresses for cameras in my router or are they managed exclusively through the NVR?

My ASUS LAN IP address is 192.168.1.1, The Subnet Mask is 255.255.255.0

I gather the Subnet mask address on the NVR must be different than the router. What should the NVR be, 255.0.0.0 ?

I will want to set up a VPN, can I get the internal system set up first and then worry about VPN?

I’m sure I will have a lot of questions but want to finally get started after purchasing everything nearly a year ago.

Thank you.
 

c hris527

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In Your router go lan settings, dhcp pool, I start mine at 192.168.1.50, anything under that is reserved for static IP's I would just set all my equipment like cams, NVR's static from the get go in the range you reserve away from your dhcp server pool. Make sure you know how many devices you need static and adjust your reserve addresses. Your subnet mask should be the SAME as the router. Get your system running then worry about the VPN, just keep it off the Internet until you get it locked down.
 

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bigredfish

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Leave it alone. Your NVR has a built in PoE switch. Your network, which is very common, will work just fine. I’ve setup 3 in recent months exactly the same.

Your NVR will assign IPs to your Dahua cameras in the 10.1.1.x range providing an extra layer of security and you will still be able to access everything via vpn.

See this lnk below:

 
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Midway

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Leave it alone. Your NVR has a built in PoE switch. Your network, which is very common, will work just fine. I’ve setup 3 in recent months exactly the same.

Your NVR will assign IPs to your Dahua cameras in the 10.1.1.x range providing an extra layer of security and you will still be able to access everything via vpn.

Thank you.

i just need to go to the RT-AC88U LAN - DHCP server tab and enable Manual Assignment, then add a static IP address? No need to change the DHCP range or it doesn't matter whether I do or not?

(Manually Assigned IP around the DHCP list (Max Limit : 64) )

Any issue with just adding a couple cameras at a time? I have a fairly big house and it will take some time and thought on how and where to run cable and install cameras.


Thanks.
 

bigredfish

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I didnt set a static route in the router to the NVR no. By assigning the NVR a Static IP, the router attempts to give it that IP upon frequest as long as there is no other device on the network with it. I found that using 192.168.1.254 for the NVR works well because the router typically starts handing our DHCP addresses at .2 and rarely if ever will hand out .254 on its own in a normal home environment. But then the last two buddies I helped have one using .161 and one using .200

No problem adding cameras as you get to them. If you have a problem with one automatically moving to the bottom pane by itself, reboot the NVR with the camera plugged in and it will usually resolve itself and assign it to the bottom pane and a port of 1,2,3 etc as in my screengrab on the PSA link page.
 

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I didnt set a static route in the router to the NVR no. By assigning the NVR a Static IP, the router attempts to give it that IP upon frequest as long as there is no other device on the network with it. I found that using 192.168.1.254 for the NVR works well because the router typically starts handing our DHCP addresses at .2 and rarely if ever will hand out .254 on its own in a normal home environment. But then the last two buddies I helped have one using .161 and one using .200

No problem adding cameras as you get to them. If you have a problem with one automatically moving to the bottom pane by itself, reboot the NVR with the camera plugged in and it will usually resolve itself and assign it to the bottom pane and a port of 1,2,3 etc as in my screengrab on the PSA link page.
Correct me if I am wrong but it sounds like you are assigning a manual IP address inside the Router DHCP range and assuming it will get the same assignment if the Router reboots for any reason (Power failure, firmware update eg.).

I would think assigning a static IP address outside the DHCP pool would be a better option.

I would appreciate clarification and want to set this up the optimal way the first time. I can have 30 or more clients on my network at any given time before adding the NVR.

Thanks.
 

SouthernYankee

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On the asus router you can assign static address inside the DHCP range. On my asus router, assign IP addresses by using the device MAC address. I assign all the "static" addresses in the router. I do not have more than 64 static devices

asus2.jpg
 

bigredfish

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I’m assigning the NVR a static ip within the 192.169.1.x dhcp network that the router is broadcasting. I dont set any static route TO the NVR inside the router. I have 8-10 systems running this way right now.

the risk would be another device getting my NVR IP, I get that. But set at .254 I’ve yet to have it happen in a home
 

Midway

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On the asus router you can assign static address inside the DHCP range. On my asus router, assign IP addresses by using the device MAC address. I assign all the "static" addresses in the router. I do not have more than 64 static devices
Thanks, yes I understand that and was referring to it with this comment in my post "Correct me if I am wrong but it sounds like you are assigning a manual IP address inside the Router DHCP range"

My question was, while it would work as you described, wouldn't assigning a static IP outside the DHCP range also work. My research on network focused forums have shown a preference to a true static assignment that is not managed by the Router DHCP server. Assigning a "static" IP within the range is actually not a true static address but A DHCP reservation and is an IP you reserve within your DHCP scope, so the DHCP server will always allocate the same IP.

A common type of reply I read while searching: "A lot of people confuse "static IPs" with "lease reservations". Static IPs, which are manually configured on the network interface, should be outside of a DHCP scope, as they aren't managed by the DHCP server. Lease reservations, which are allocated dynamically by the DHCP server, should be within its scope."
 

c hris527

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Thanks, yes I understand that and was referring to it with this comment in my post "Correct me if I am wrong but it sounds like you are assigning a manual IP address inside the Router DHCP range"

My question was, while it would work as you described, wouldn't assigning a static IP outside the DHCP range also work. My research on network focused forums have shown a preference to a true static assignment that is not managed by the Router DHCP server. Assigning a "static" IP within the range is actually not a true static address but A DHCP reservation and is an IP you reserve within your DHCP scope, so the DHCP server will always allocate the same IP.

A common type of reply I read while searching: "A lot of people confuse "static IPs" with "lease reservations". Static IPs, which are manually configured on the network interface, should be outside of a DHCP scope, as they aren't managed by the DHCP server. Lease reservations, which are allocated dynamically by the DHCP server, should be within its scope."
I guess its just how AD&D you want to be with your network, I like my ducks in a row as you saw in my first post, I have a lot of network stuff here that I need sorted so I do keep a set of IP addresses outside the DHCP pool. Most home and smaller networks can get away with doing nothing and let the router do its job stock. Most Homeowners just plug stuff in and it works for years with little or no issues. In other works its not a issue until its a issue, you saw here 3 different ways in this thread on how to do it, I guess its now up to you to do what is comfortable for you.
 
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