Mounting to Soffit with no backing?

mercfh

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
26
Location
United States
Has anyone done this? I mounted my first Security Camera on my front door on the soffit and used some 2x4 between the joists to screw to (got at least 1 screw in so it's pretty secure).

But i've also seen video's where people just mount them to the vinyl/aluminum soffit (Just screwing them in) and that's it? I mean I guess the camera's aren't very heavy so I see no reason why they would fall.

I would place a piece of aluminum on the back porch camera but it's actually under a deck roof so it's not exactly a soffit but more like a vinyl roof panel.

Can I just screw it in and that's it? I don't see why it would fall? Maybe I can just some toggle bolts?

Thanks!
 

mat200

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
9,703
Reaction score
13,275
Has anyone done this? I mounted my first Security Camera on my front door on the soffit and used some 2x4 between the joists to screw to (got at least 1 screw in so it's pretty secure).

But i've also seen video's where people just mount them to the vinyl/aluminum soffit (Just screwing them in) and that's it? I mean I guess the camera's aren't very heavy so I see no reason why they would fall.

I would place a piece of aluminum on the back porch camera but it's actually under a deck roof so it's not exactly a soffit but more like a vinyl roof panel.

Can I just screw it in and that's it? I don't see why it would fall? Maybe I can just some toggle bolts?

Thanks!
Hi @mercfh

I've seen numerous vandals as well as high winds in my time, so I would recommend securing your cameras well.

This is why I now use 1-2x 2.5-3" screws on my cameras into a stud or other sturdy backing ( like plywood ). Normally the other screws I use are shorter and into a less supported section of the wall / soffit.
 

handinpalm

Getting comfortable
Joined
Sep 21, 2016
Messages
673
Reaction score
1,396
Location
Tampa Bay FL
I have a perforated vinyl soffit w/ 3' overhang. I have mounted Dahua Turret cams directly to the vinyl using oversized wood screws. Been there over 2 years w/ 80+mph hurricane winds. Ya..... it will work. Also have the 4 LED external IR illuminators mounted directly to vinyl. No problems. Like the BIgfish said, it may not be advised.
 

0658

Young grasshopper
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
51
Reaction score
16
Location
Windermere, FL
When initially mounting my cameras I first mounted a plastic light switch cover of the size needed with holes drilled in the corners to my aluminum soffit. Before mounting I premounted the cameras I use to the light switch cover. The cameras literally went through a hurricane 2 years ago without issue.

I have since updated my method of mounting the cameras to the soffit. Several areas where I want to mount cameras my soffit, the soffit is only 12 inches wide. I purchased some 1/4 inch thick plexiglass, figured out the orientation that I needed to mount the cameras and then predrilled the holes to the proper size for the camera screws (Plexiglas splits if the holes are too small) I slipped one edge under the soffit 90 degree mounting edge and then screwed the other end to the soffit edge with self tapping screws. It is very strong and stable compared to mounting directly to the soffit.

I got the idea from someone on you tube that used aluminum to do the same thing on a wider soffit. With a wider overhang you might want to think about using a door kickplate made of metal and screw it in in multiple places. I was thinking of that but the plexiglass worked better for my situation.
 

Ckb3

Pulling my weight
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
163
I installed all of mine with a 1x6 attached to a 2x4 then attached the 2x4 to the existing 2x6 behind the soffit. Then with some careful measuring, drilled a 2-1/2" hole saw through it and the aluminum soffit material. Mounted the camera base to that and haven't looked back. To do all that i had to remove the fascia and soffit material. It was a pain but worth it. My neighbor hired someone to install his and they mounted without support. He gets motion alerts on his system from the wind shaking the cameras.
 

awsum140

Known around here
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
1,262
Reaction score
1,129
Location
Southern NJ
A strip of aluminum long enough to be tucked into the house and facia flanges will work, too. Works for cameras and IR illuminators.

20180619_130739.jpg 20190205_150048.jpg
Advantage being no holes in the soffet. Disadvantage being that you need to remove a piece of soffet. That can be time consuming, but not having holes in the soffet is worth it, at least to me.
 

Whoaru99

Pulling my weight
Joined
Dec 22, 2018
Messages
422
Reaction score
159
Location
Here
I needed to put up a cam quick-like and screwed the mounting box directly to aluminum soffit with #14 sheet metal screws. The aluminum is pretty thin so I'd expect the cam could be pulled off without huge effort. But, I think it's not going anywhere under normal conditions. It'll get reinforced, along with adding more cam locations, when the weather is more conducive to working outside.
 

xdq

Young grasshopper
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
48
Reaction score
19
Location
m
I previously mounted one of mine to a uPVC soffit with standard screws and some Gorilla double sided tape. When I moved it after 2 years the tape was still holding well enough that I had to twist the camera base to release it. It was up above the 1st floor window (2nd floor US) so no worries about vandals.
 

mercfh

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
26
Location
United States
Good to know. There are some places where I don't have super good access to so i've had to mount my 3 camera's to the Vinyl Soffit...but I haven't seen any "shake" under any conditions. Although at some point i'll probably slip a piece of plywood or something in between and re-drill them to go into the wood...but I just don't have those types of tools currently right now.
 

xtropodx

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
123
Reaction score
29
I'm looking at installing some domes soon but wanted some input on how best to securely install them under the eaves/soffit given what I have;


eves.jpg

Nothing is removable at all & requires access either via the ceiling or roof tiles, both of which are a pain.
I could attach them to the brick wall but I'd much prefer under the eaves/soffit.
Looking for minimal physical impact/damage.

EDIT: Would I need any sort of junction box if done this way.
 

TonyR

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
9,877
Reaction score
18,981
Location
Alabama
I'm looking at installing some domes soon but wanted some input on how best to securely install them under the eaves/soffit given what I have;

Nothing is removable at all & requires access either via the ceiling or roof tiles, both of which are a pain.
I could attach them to the brick wall but I'd much prefer under the eaves/soffit.
Looking for minimal physical impact/damage.

EDIT: Would I need any sort of junction box if done this way.
I'd use the boxes made to fit your cams. It will protect the pigtail and termination from the elements and allow a smaller hole (drill 3/8" hole for the CAT-5e or 6 cable and install the RJ-45 connector AFTER you pull it through from attic). You'd have to have a hole twice as big or greater (3/4 to 1") to push the pigtail into the soffit.

Also, you could dismount/change out camera from the box as often as you like without wearing out holes in what looks like painted Masonite or composite wood board.
 

xtropodx

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
123
Reaction score
29
Yes the eaves are like a flimsy thin wooden board. I could punch a hole in it with my fist.

So would its junction box be attached to the outside or inside & would it be good idea to have something solid to attach it to, as I suspect either way by not having something solid attached to it it'd be easy to remove/move?
 

TonyR

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
9,877
Reaction score
18,981
Location
Alabama
Yes the eaves are like a flimsy thin wooden board. I could punch a hole in it with my fist.

So would its junction box be attached to the outside or inside & would it be good idea to have something solid to attach it to, as I suspect either way by not having something solid attached to it it'd be easy to remove/move?
I'd use hollow wall fasteners (2 large or 3 small) like these from HD or Lowes. It'll keep the holes small. Insert from outside, under the soffit, expand then attach boxes to them using the screws that come with the fastener. You may have to drill holes in the bottom of the box:

hollow-drywall-anchors-803762-64_1000.jpg
 

TonyR

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
9,877
Reaction score
18,981
Location
Alabama
@xtropodx ,
Since it's plywood and not particle/composite, AND the above anchors are more for drywall, the throat may be too deep and they won't allow the anchor to cinch up tight. You may be better off using these metal hollow door and drywall fasteners as below because the threads run the entire 1" length so they can bite as soon as inserted and driven AND they're strong enough to even hit a stud.

1 in. Hollow Door and Drywall Anchors (25-Pack)

hollow-drywall-anchors.jpg
 

xtropodx

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
123
Reaction score
29
Because of how flimsy wood is, really need something to distribute the load as much as possible. Wood is maybe only 6mm thick & leightweight.
 

TonyR

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
9,877
Reaction score
18,981
Location
Alabama
Because of how flimsy wood is, really need something to distribute the load as much as possible. Wood is maybe only 6mm thick & leightweight.
Aren't there furring strips or joists that run behind it? It's attached to something so try a stud locator or sounding with your knuckle. If it's as thin/lightweight as you say then it should even "give" a little when you push it and it should stop abruptly when it hits the the solid joist behind it .......there's a way to find a more solid attachment point! ;)
 
Top