Patch panel question

Donut17

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I have been reading and searching but not really found anything specific about patch panels other than some members use them. I already have a 5 camera system working fine with BI but would like to better organize my system as I add cameras. My home network also needs better organization. These are basically separate systems (BI computer connected to home network with a second NIC card as described in the WIKI on this website).

So I bought a V7 brand perforated 9U server rack to better organize my home network and my camera system into one central box. I already use Monoprice Cat6 cable and a Netgear GS108PP POE switch with BI. I am looking to purchase two Cable Matters 24 port patch panels (Amazon) for my new rack.

My question is there any advice on using patch panels? Any experience with this particular patch panel? Do patch panels introduce any interference? Drop voltages with POE switches? Anything to be aware of or watch out for?

Thanks in advance!
 

saltwater

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I ended up using an unloaded patch panels (3 x 24) and I haven't yet had a problem with them. All you need to do is terminate in the incoming cat cable with an rj45, easy, and plug that into the female connector, that connector clips into the patch panel.

I can't comment about the loss of signal, but I suppose there is always potential for a loss of signal at any break in the line.
 

Mike A.

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Insignificant as far as any loss or other problems using panels assuming that things are done right. Virtually all big networks do.

Depends on your setup but given a choice generally I prefer to terminate my cable to a wall-mounted panel and then jump over to the rack from there. I like that better in most cases than rack mounted panels which are more of a pain to get into to do punchdowns/moves/adds/changes. That way you have all of your premise cabling independent of the equipment stack and you can move the whole rack and/or things inside easier as needed. Rack-mounted better in a data center environment. Usually can't do much else.

As above, the unloaded panels with independent jacks are easier to punch down. The downside is they're usually more expensive by the time you add all of the jacks you need.
 
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ptzman

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I have been reading and searching but not really found anything specific about patch panels other than some members use them. I already have a 5 camera system working fine with BI but would like to better organize my system as I add cameras. My home network also needs better organization. These are basically separate systems (BI computer connected to home network with a second NIC card as described in the WIKI on this website).

So I bought a V7 brand perforated 9U server rack to better organize my home network and my camera system into one central box. I already use Monoprice Cat6 cable and a Netgear GS108PP POE switch with BI. I am looking to purchase two Cable Matters 24 port patch panels (Amazon) for my new rack.

My question is there any advice on using patch panels? Any experience with this particular patch panel? Do patch panels introduce any interference? Drop voltages with POE switches? Anything to be aware of or watch out for?

Thanks in advance!
Instead of using a regular patch panel, why not use a Ditek DTK-RM12POE panel. I will provide the same function as a patch panel as well as surge protection and POE power for future cameras within the same space.
 

ptzman

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i gave up on patch panel. one less thing to worry about.

I just terminate the cable with RJ45 and plug straight into the switch.
I screwed up on my reply. I meant to say, instead of using a regular patch panel, why not use a Ditek DTK-RM12POE panel. It will provide the same function as a patch panel as well as surge protection for both cameras and other devices (NVR, computer, etc.) within the same space. Any additional panel and wiring will add another level for troubleshooting if something goes wrong
 

ptzman

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there are many benefits in using patch panels.. but for my/home use i don't see the point :) .
For neatness i just hide the cables as much as i can.
I agree with you, that is why I suggested to use the Ditek panel instead of a regular panel for the added benefit of surge protection. I have two brand new patch panels that I dreamed of using until I obtained a 19” rack and saw no real use for them after using the Ditek surge panel for my cameras. If I had two switches that were separated by a distance and I would be swapping devices between the switches, maybe I would need the patch panels.
 

nostrawag

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I have been reading and searching but not really found anything specific about patch panels other than some members use them. I already have a 5 camera system working fine with BI but would like to better organize my system as I add cameras. My home network also needs better organization. These are basically separate systems (BI computer connected to home network with a second NIC card as described in the WIKI on this website).

So I bought a V7 brand perforated 9U server rack to better organize my home network and my camera system into one central box. I already use Monoprice Cat6 cable and a Netgear GS108PP POE switch with BI. I am looking to purchase two Cable Matters 24 port patch panels (Amazon) for my new rack.

My question is there any advice on using patch panels? Any experience with this particular patch panel? Do patch panels introduce any interference? Drop voltages with POE switches? Anything to be aware of or watch out for?

Thanks in advance!
patch panels are used extensively in high volume corporates and datacentres throughout the world. if there were a problem with data corruption/loss using them, Im sure they wuoldn't be used bu the likes of google and anyone else for that matter. just adding my two cents worth.
 

nostrawag

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For my cctv I’ve got a patch panel in the loft but ended up not using it as I really couldn’t see the point, so terminated the ends with a connector and plugged straight into the switch.
yes, that also works. it's not as if you'll be swapping fly leads regularly etc... at the very least less clutter. ;)
 

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I would say in small installations, labeling the cables is more important then using a patch panel.
In medium sized, probably a toss up unless it is in plain view and will be seen often.
In a larger sized setup, for sure use a patch panel.

If you use a patch panel, please buy a proper tool to punch things down!

Too many times, I have had to change out a patch panel when someone took a screw driver and
tried to punch a cable down, spreading the connector and making it useless.
 

ptzman

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A good use for a patch panel would be to provide POE voltage to your cameras if your NVR or switch does not provide it. You can daisy chain the POE voltage from a standalone POE supply to the correct terminals on a punch down patch panel.
 

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A good use for a patch panel would be to provide POE voltage to your cameras if your NVR or switch does not provide it. You can daisy chain the POE voltage from a standalone POE supply to the correct terminals on a punch down patch panel.
I like using something like this. I use this is for Ubiquity gear, you might need a different voltage for certain devices.
 

ptzman

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That is similar to my setup. I use the Mean Well SDR-240-48 5A power supply for the POE power source. Therefore, I can use the patch panel for its intended use (if you need one) and supply power to hungry cameras like those high wattage PTZ’s.
 

alastairstevenson

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I use the Mean Well SDR-240-48 5A power supply for the POE power source.
So you are not supporting the 802.3af / at PSE connection initiation standard that ensures that non-PD devices don't get 48v down their cable whether they need it or not?
 

ptzman

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So you are not supporting the 802.3af / at PSE connection initiation standard that ensures that non-PD devices don't get 48v down their cable whether they need it or not?
The wiring of POE does not affect non-PD devices. Out of the eight wiring pairs, four pairs can be use for POE. You can plug a non-PD in a POE switch due to the wiring of the pairs per the standards without any damages
 

ptzman

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The wiring of POE does not affect non-PD devices. Out of the eight wiring pairs, four pairs can be use for POE. You can plug a non-PD in a POE switch due to the wiring of the pairs per the standards without any damages
I am going to restate this. The wiring of POE does not affect non-PD devices. Out of the four wiring pairs (8 wires), two pairs (4 wires) can be use for POE. You can plug a non-PD in a POE switch due to the wiring of the pairs per the standards without any damages
 

alastairstevenson

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wiring of POE does not affect non-PD devices. Out of the four wiring pairs (8 wires), two pairs (4 wires) can be use for POE. You can plug a non-PD in a POE switch due to the wiring of the pairs per the standards without any damages
Sure.
My comment wasn't so much about the wiring - it was about the possibility that connecting a passive PoE cable to a non-PoE device might harm it.
An active, standards-based PoE power source will not supply 48v down the cable unless the powered device on the end of the cable performs the power startup handshake.
So you'd have to be sure to not accidentally connect a non-PoE device to a cable that has the 48v power supply hooked up to the other end.
 
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