how to make good cat6 cables all the time

PointLookout247

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If anyone has purchased cat cables and planned on terminating themselves, especially with cat6 solid strand, check out these vids below. I couldn't figure out until this guy explained the wire guide correctly;

 

jasburrito

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Nice work. I had no idea how that worked. When I was at depot the guy next to me was a professional installer of cat wire. He looked at me and said buy this. Data shark network tool kit. Gonna be installing my first end soon. Update. Jus looked at the kit. It is not even for cat6. Frikin boner had my by the wrong tool and ends.
 
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tigerwillow1

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I learned a few things from these videos, the most significant being the trick to cut the center spine in the cat6 cables. One nit, he leaves the impression that all cat6 cable is 23 awg. He should have said something like "usually" or "in most cases". I also think he should have given more credit to the inserts, which he calls wire guides (2nd video only). He said that after a lot of experience it's easier without the inserts. I have a really hard time believing that, but then again, he's probably crimped a lot more rj45s than I have. He though there's a high risk of threading the inserts upside-down and having to do it over. I made up a "cheat sheet" that tells exactly how to hold the insert, and I've never done one upside down. (I did, early on, stick the wires into the wrong end of the insert, which is what led to the cheat sheet). And Monoprice has good instructions for using the inserts on their web site.
 

PointLookout247

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Monoprice has good cat6 cable, tho it's a pita. The key is cutting that separator low and then using that wire guide, cutting the wire at 45 degrees angle to side in... Then crimp away...
 

TonyR

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A little something I posted a few days ago on another thread ==>> here. I've been using Monoprice's 2-piece (Insert with lip and RJ-45 male) for my CAT-6 lately. Like anything, the first couple are not easy, but then you get the hang of it.

I have even better luck by using the non-serrated, flat part of my needle nosed pliers to gently flatten the wires, one at a time, in one plane then rotate the pliers 90 degrees and flatten in another plane. They then lay closer to each other, go into the insert easier, and allow the insert to get closer to the outer jacket, all the way up to where each pair's twist begins.

Sure, it takes longer but it insures I get the benefit of CAT-6 by keeping the pairs twisted as much as possible and no re-do's.

Angle-cut_CAT-6_2b.jpg
 

tangent

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I have that checker tool as well works good. I think this process is a pita no matter getting wires lined up. I used the ideal ones and now use the pass through which is in fact easier and allows a lot of insulation crimp every time

Klein Tools 6 in. Pass Thru Modular Crimper-VDV226-110 - The Home Depot

It is still a pita
One trick is in how you fan out the pairs. Fold the orange and brown pairs to opposite sides, leave the green and blue sticking up. Untwist and straighten the green pair first and spreading the straightened wires wide on opposite sides of the blue pair. Then untwist / straighten the blue pair followed by the orange and brown pairs. I like to use a flush cutter to cut the wires and spline.

There are also some tools you can use to speed up the untwisting / straightening. Ball point pens, mechanical pencils, spudgers, and the jacket you removed work among other things.
 
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pal251

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I used to use the traditional method and now use platinum tools ez rj45 which looks the same as the pass through Klein tools piece . I now mainly just do patch panels and keystone Jack's when I install cameras with a factory patch cable.
 

PointLookout247

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Great advice on here. I was considering having to buy all new pre terminated cables... Then I found info on you tube after a full day on different videos. The cable checker tool is cheap and a must have. Main concern was getting all them cables into that plug in order.... I didn't see the pack of guides until the 2nd bum cable... There was no info in the pack on how to do it either which was annoying. Thanks to YouTube and forums like this, normal people can save money and add something to their repertoire.
 

jcc

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For outdoor cameras do not forget grounding. I use Vertical Cable part #012-021, with the load bar. I also wrap the drip wire in copper paper.
 

gpower07

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A little something I posted a few days ago on another thread ==>> here. I've been using Monoprice's 2-piece (Insert with lip and RJ-45 male) for my CAT-6 lately. Like anything, the first couple are not easy, but then you get the hang of it.

I have even better luck by using the non-serrated, flat part of my needle nosed pliers to gently flatten the wires, one at a time, in one plane then rotate the pliers 90 degrees and flatten in another plane. They then lay closer to each other, go into the insert easier, and allow the insert to get closer to the outer jacket, all the way up to where each pair's twist begins.

Sure, it takes longer but it insures I get the benefit of CAT-6 by keeping the pairs twisted as much as possible and no re-do's.

View attachment 28539
that's what I use. I bought 10 bags last time. last 2 years.
 

TonyR

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Commit to memory...
I had the T-568B color code memorized OK before......but they were boring, lifeless wires. Thanks, mate! :D

P.S. - I was on R&R in Sydney in 1972, after my second Westpac in the Tonkin Gulf off Vietnam and it remains the only place that I visited during my military service that I would care to return to.

The people there actually liked Yanks; me and a shipmate would be on liberty, in uniform, walking down the street and would get pulled into bars and bought drinks, dragged into restaurants and bought a steak; two girls that were sisters took us home to meet their parents and their mom sat us down to a home-cooked meal. The next day they called their friend 'Bruce' and all 5 us piled into a hot-rodded Mini-Cooper S and went to the zoo and then the docks where we took a ferryboat ride, we sailed past the iconic Sydney Opera House under construction. Not once did anyone let us pay for any thing.

I'll never forget the hospitality and kindness your country's men and women showed us.
 
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Arjun

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Once I insert the 8 wires through the load bar, I usually just use a pair of snips to flush cut the wires against the load bar and push the load bar directly into the connector and crimp into place. I find it better than the EZ connector. :D

A little something I posted a few days ago on another thread ==>> here. I've been using Monoprice's 2-piece (Insert with lip and RJ-45 male) for my CAT-6 lately. Like anything, the first couple are not easy, but then you get the hang of it.

I have even better luck by using the non-serrated, flat part of my needle nosed pliers to gently flatten the wires, one at a time, in one plane then rotate the pliers 90 degrees and flatten in another plane. They then lay closer to each other, go into the insert easier, and allow the insert to get closer to the outer jacket, all the way up to where each pair's twist begins.

Sure, it takes longer but it insures I get the benefit of CAT-6 by keeping the pairs twisted as much as possible and no re-do's.

View attachment 28539
 

Tengu

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Once I insert the 8 wires through the load bar, I usually just use a pair of snips to flush cut the wires against the load bar and push the load bar directly into the connector and crimp into place. I find it better than the EZ connector. :D
Thanks for the tip Arjun, I'll give it a try on the next one :highfive:
 

Arjun

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Its an unconventional way but it works. I specifically use a sharp pair of cable shears on the the wires (for achieving a flush cut as much as possible), sometimes it cuts part of the plastic material of the load pair, but never really matters, because the wires never go out of alignment thanks to the load bar. :lol:

Thanks for the tip Arjun, I'll give it a try on the next one :highfive:
 

TonyR

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Its an unconventional way but it works. I specifically use a sharp pair of cable shears on the the wires (for achieving a flush cut as much as possible), sometimes it cuts part of the plastic material of the load pair, but never really matters, because the wires never go out of alignment thanks to the load bar. :lol:
Yeah, I use my needle nose pliers to grab all 4-pairs before cutting and pull one way while pushing the load bar down tight against the pairs just as they come out of the jacket before flush-cutting, keeping that pair-twist together as much as possible to help maintain that CAT-6 spec.
 

tangent

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I'm kinda confused...
Why would you buy a cat6 cable for a cameras install, unless it's a part of the whole house re-wire project?
Cat5e is much more easier to handle and provides you with all the bandwidth x 100 a camera will ever need.
Both work obviously. Do you need cat-6? no. Cat-6 is a little tougher and harder for people to damage during install (but slower to terminate) and the slightly bigger wires can carry more current if you have a particularly power hungry camera.
 

mat200

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I'm kinda confused...
Why would you buy a cat6 cable for a cameras install, unless it's a part of the whole house re-wire project?
Cat5e is much more easier to handle and provides you with all the bandwidth x 100 a camera will ever need.
Hi Unleashed,

I think this may have been covered in the cliff notes and other posts.

1) Cat6 is stronger cable, and thicker - thus less likely to break during pulls ( especially if you have people who pull too hard on it )
2) Cat6 may have thicker wires, remember to buy solid copper. If so, it will be slightly more effective carrying power
3) If you're buying a bulk box / spool of cat6 you can also use it for other runs / jobs where you may want faster speeds ( like to your media center )

I have used both cat6 and cat5e for IP PoE cameras - I like to use cat5e when pulling multiple cables through a 1/2" EMT conduit. Otherwise I prefer cat6.
 
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