Progressive Liberal Hypocrisy

tigerwillow1

Known around here
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
3,844
Reaction score
8,507
Location
USA, Oregon
In Chicago, either AI or microphones are racist. Maybe both.

"Chicago won't renew its ShotSpotter contract and plans to stop using the controversial gunshot detection system later this year,.....The system, which relies on an artificial intelligence algorithm and network of microphones to identify gunshots, has been criticized for inaccuracy, racial bias and law enforcement misuse."

And if it is law enforcement abuse, don't fix that, kill the messenger.

Chicago to stop using controversial gunshot detection technology this year
 

wittaj

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
24,884
Reaction score
48,526
Location
USA
He had to move into a gated community for his safety, yet he and his girlfriend supports no border fence politicians

 

wittaj

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
24,884
Reaction score
48,526
Location
USA

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando
We've known the woke progressive have purposely worked towards undermining this county and ending it. At least she admitted to it instead of pretending their DEI are meant to make the country stronger.

1707883082535.png

1707883054594.png

 

mat200

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
13,897
Reaction score
23,187
Brace for it FL, TX, AZ, NV. The libs who shit the bed are unhappy with the sleeping arrangements and probably want to come to your States and let you know how to do things better.

View attachment 186263

Robots and AI will be very cheap compared to $50 an hour as minimum wage ..
 

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando
It's nice to see RFID finally making it down to the basic consumer level. I worked on this technology at the IBM Watson Research Center in NY back in 1995/1996. Back then batteryless RFID tags didn't exist and most common battery powered RFID tags were things like those toll expressway tags that were large plastic boxes (because of the battery and antenna size) mounted under your bumper and certainly not cheap enough to attach to a sandwich.

The batteryless RFID tags had to be able to recover enough RF energy from a max 1W transmitter basestation in order to power up. This of course was way before the commonality of things like wireless chargers that everyone is familiar with today.

Below is what the prototypes looks like (it's about 2" long and 1/4" high). A small integrated circuit with an antenna mounted on a flexible film which could allow some bending and could be sewn into a shirt collar it you wanted to. We were trying to drive down the cost such that tags like this could be placed on every grocery item. The ideal case would be to place your groceries in your plastic shopping cart (now common today too) then just push through the exit where the RF basestation was located.

I designed the digital circuitry and we had analog engineers for the front end to recover the RF modulated commands and power plus antenna engineers. We had a ton of patents that came off of this project. The IBM Watson Research Center is an interesting place with mostly PHD types working in the building. Across the hall from me I could always hear engineers on another project reading out loud interesting and odd phrases throughout the day. You probably guessed it, they were the engineers developing advanced speech recognition algorithms back before speech recognition had advanced to the point it is today.

1707920742201.png
 
Last edited:

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando
Footnote to above:

IBM Research was long curved building with a hallway running the length next to the front windows. There was an engineer who used to rollerskate down the hallway since it was such a long walk from one side to the other. You can just imagine a bunch of PHD types concentrated in one building. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: But let me tell you, the vast majority of them were the nicest people and treated me at the same level with respect even though I only had my lowly BS degree.

1707921534041.png
 
Last edited:

garycrist

Known around here
Joined
Sep 25, 2021
Messages
2,317
Reaction score
6,838
Location
Texas
I did a lot of work on NCR's wireless card @902MHz. band. They had the tool (card) but,
they did not know what could be done with them. The coolest thing about them was Novel
had a nic driver that would bind to the card BINGO!! My son got them to work in Linux too.

We had to connect to a base station, the ISP at that time, about 5 miles away but behind a
tall hill with no direct sight. There was a mountain with a big water tank that I used both as a passive repeater.

We also built a repeater running Linux with 2 cards and physical separation of the 2 antennas
so no duplexers were needed to achieve simultaneous TX/RX with no mutual interference.
That went up on top of a mountain so that a village in a valley could connect on the other side
of the mountain.

All of that was in 95-96 way too early for the time....
 

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando

rolibr24

Getting comfortable
Joined
Dec 3, 2021
Messages
651
Reaction score
3,006
Location
USA
It's nice to see RFID finally making it down to the basic consumer level. I worked on this technology at the IBM Watson Research Center in NY back in 1995/1996. Back then batteryless RFID tags didn't exist and most common battery powered RFID tags were things like those toll expressway tags that were large plastic boxes (because of the battery and antenna size) mounted under your bumper and certainly not cheap enough to attach to a sandwich.

The batteryless RFID tags had to be able to recover enough RF energy from a max 1W transmitter basestation in order to power up. This of course was way before the commonality of things like wireless chargers that everyone is familiar with today.

Below is what the prototypes looks like (it's about 2" long and 1/4" high). A small integrated circuit with an antenna mounted on a flexible film which could allow some bending and could be sewn into a shirt collar it you wanted to. We were trying to drive down the cost such that tags like this could be placed on every grocery item. The ideal case would be to place your groceries in your plastic shopping cart (now common today too) then just push through the exit where the RF basestation was located.

I designed the digital circuitry and we had analog engineers for the front end to recover the RF modulated commands and power plus antenna engineers. We had a ton of patents that came off of this project. The IBM Watson Research Center is an interesting place with mostly PHD types working in the building. Across the hall from me I could always hear engineers on another project reading out loud interesting and odd phrases throughout the day. You probably guessed it, they were the engineers developing advanced speech recognition algorithms back before speech recognition had advanced to the point it is today.

View attachment 186283
We use RFID in ear tags of our livestock. Just a quick scan and that animals information is on my phone. They walk into a feeder, the feeder reads their tag and drops the feed they need.

I see RFID becoming very popular in grocery stores like that article says. If the socialists want a 15, 20, 25, 30 dollar an hour minimum wage. RFID is the future, eliminate minimum wage jobs. Technology is cheaper than someone manning a cash register.

I’m in the automation business. Everyone is looking for automation to lower the employee need at companies.
You’d think with the millions of “immigrants“ crossing the boarder that cheap labor would be easy to find. But everyone I talk to says it’s not.

These boarder crossers are obviously not out applying for jobs, because if they were there would be need for automation.
 

rolibr24

Getting comfortable
Joined
Dec 3, 2021
Messages
651
Reaction score
3,006
Location
USA
undocumented iirc hard to hire without papers ..

In the industry I am in, and employers I have been at, that doesn’t mean anything.

I know places where they pay someone 2k at a meetup to pay for the transportation from Texas to pick someone up. The driver of the van loads up in Texas, (10 guys in a minivan) drives across the country and makes various stops for drops.

One stop in a big city and this van load of people can get the correct documents for a few hundred bucks to be employed.
 

Sybertiger

Known around here
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
13,441
Location
Orlando
undocumented iirc hard to hire without papers ..
My lawn guy has two "mexicans" working on his crew who don't speak a lick of English. No paper. Don't ask, don't tell...LOL. That's kind of the day laborer category though. But, even he says it's not like they are getting paid pennies on the dollar. They get paid pretty close to what other "legals" get paid and probably make more due to no taxes.
 
Top